Mechanical Engineering Heritage

Recognition of Mechanical Engineering Heritage is important for us in realizing how science and technology has impacted our society.

In the Mechanical Engineering Heritage, we can see the history of the dream realizing efforts of engineers. We should not see the past in the heritage but have a grand dream of the future to be realized.

The JSME looks beyond and contributes further to advancement of science and technology in order to make out dreams tangible and weave the future.


No.1:Site

The steam engines and hauling machinery at the Kosuge Ship Repair Dock

The Kosuge Ship Repair Dock is an existing modern shipbuilding facility that was constructed in the earliest stage of shipbuilding, or the end of the Edo Era. In 1867, the Satsuma-han started construction of the dock with partner Thomas.B. Glover and others for the purpose of repairing steam ships they imported from foreign countries. The dock was completed in 1868.

The dock is a western-slipway type and it could haul a ship weighing up to 1,000 tons. The hauling machinery is housed in the earliest-stage brick house built in Japan and includes a Corniche boiler from England, a 2-cylinder vertical steam engine (25 HP), and a hauling gear device. Carriages are arranged like an abacus on rails laid down on a gentle slope, and ships are loaded by being hauled onto the abacuses at high tide. The dock thus goes by the name ‘Soroban Dock.’ It was designated as a national historical site in 1969.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Affiliate with Nagasaki Shipyard, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. Kowa Kogyo, Co., Ltd. Marine Center Kosuge Office

● Hours open: 9:00–16:00
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Dec. 31–Jan. 4 (Marine Center Kosuge Office closes)
● Address: 1 Kosuge-machi, Nagasaki-shi, Nagasaki 850-0934
● Tel: +81-95-822-3988
● Access: Near Kosuge Bus Stop. 15 mins. by Nagasaki Bus from Nagasaki Sta. (for Nomozaki, Fukahori, Koyagi), JR Liner.


No.2:Landmark

Memorial workshop and cultural machine tools in Kumamoto University

Eleven machine tools preserved in the Museum of Engineering Faculty, Kumamoto University, were designated as national important cultural properties in 1994. The building was completed in 1908 as an experiment factory of old machines, named a memorial workshop, and has been used for research and education purposes for about 60 years. This is a Western-style research and education facility of the Meiji period that was built during the early stages of the development of industrial technologies in Japan, and is among few such facilities in existence. This cultural property thus has considerable historical and technological value, including its machine tools. The 13 machine tools in total, including the 11 mentioned above, were repaired under the centenary memorial project of the Engineering Faculty and all machines and tools were preserved in working condition in 1999.

At present, these machines and tools are accessible to the public and they are also utilized by being incorporated into the engineering education program of Kumamoto University.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Museum of Engineering Faculty, Kumamoto Univ.

● Hours open: During school festivals, faculty and other events (Open when appropriate as requested).
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: May close at our convenience.
● Address: 2-39-1 Kurokami, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto-shi, Kumamoto 860-8555
● Tel: +81-96-344-2111
● URL: http://www.eng.kumamoto-u.ac.jp/facility/facility09.html

(For details, see below) http://www.mech.kumamoto-u.ac.jp/m-shop/syufukuhoukoku.htm
● Access: From Kumamoto Kotsu Center
Take city bus Tatsutaguchi/Kusunoki Line to Kumamoto Daigaku-mae stop
Take Sanko Bus bound for Aso, Otsu, Musashigaoka to Daigaku-mae stop


No.3:Collection

A Forged Iron Treadle Lathe made by Mr.Kaheiji Ito in 1875

This forged iron treadle lathe is said to have been manufactured by Kaheiji Ito, who lived in Yamagata Prefecture around 1875. He came to Tokyo in 1872 and learned machine construction at a factory of Hisashige Tanaka. It is said that he saw a lathe that came from the Netherlands, and then succeeded in manufacturing such a lathe after returning to Yamagata.

The forged iron treadle lathe was donated to the Tokyo Institute of Technology in 1932 and it has since been used as a machine of reference for research work on machines and tools. (It is said that a ‘Donation Reception Certificate’ issued on July 21, 1942, by President Hidetsugu Yagi to the Ito family exists.) Today, the lathe is exhibited in the Machinery Building of the Museum Meiji-mura Foundation in Inuyama City, Aichi Prefecture.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

The Museum Meiji-mura

● Hours open: (Mar.–Oct.) 9:30–17:00, (Nov.) 9:30–16:00, (Dec.–Feb.) 10:00–16:00
● Admission fee: 1,700 yen for adults, 1,300 yen for those aged 65 or older, 1,000 yen for high schoolers, 600 yen for elementary/junior high schoolers
● Days closed: Mondays in Dec.–Feb. (Open on holidays, Jan. 1–6), Dec. 31(See Website)
● Address: 1 Uchiyama, Inuyama-shi, Aichi 484-0000
● Tel: +81-568-67-0314
● URL: http://www.meijimura.com
● Access: 20 mins. by bus for Meijimura from Inuyama Sta., Meitetsu Inuyama Line


No.4:Collection

Land Steam Turbine (Parsons Steam Turbine)

This machine is the first domestic land steam turbine manufactured by Nagasaki Shipyard of the Mitsubishi joint-stock company (predecessor of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries) in 1908.

Through technical cooperation with the British company Parsons in 1904, they completed the Parsons 500kW turbine and the power generator and started in-house power generation on the premises. The turbine was operated at a rotation speed of 2400 rpm, a pressure of 1.03 MPa and a steam temperature of 186°C. There are a total of 84 blades, with 23 stages of the high-pressure blade made of copper and 61 stages of the medium- and low-pressure blade made of brass.

The turbine continued to be in service until 1920 and, at present, all components including the turbine rotor, moving blades, stator blades, casing and governor are preserved and exhibited in Nagasaki Shipyard Museum of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Nagasaki Shipyard Museum, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries

● Hours open: 9:00–16:30 on weekdays
● Admission fee: Adult: \800, Jr.H.S & Elem.S student: \400, Preschoolers: Free
● Days closed: The second Saturday, Public holidays, Nagasaki Shipyard’s holiday Tour may be cancelled in the case of a company event.
● Address: 1-1 Akunoura-machi, Nagasaki-shi, Nagasaki 850-8610
● Tel: +81-95-828-4134
● URL: http://www.mhi.co.jp/nsmw/html/siryoum.htm
● Access: By shuttle bus from Nagasaki station


No.5:Collection

10A Rotary Engine

In 1967, Toyo Kogyo (currently MAZDA Motor Corporation) released its ‘Cosmo Sport,’ powered by two rotary engines, for the first time in the world. The adopted engine is the 10A rotary engine, which was epoch-making and opened a new chapter in the history of the internal combustion engine. The new ‘apex seal’ technology was manufactured by impregnating high-strength carbon material or pyrolytic graphite with aluminum, which prevented wavy wear on the internal surface of the rotor housing, thereby achieving high durability that can withstand a traveling distance of 100,000 km. The side intake port and the 2-stage, 4-barrel carburetor always ensure a stable air– fuel mixture, and efficient combustion is achieved by adopting two ignition plugs for each rotor, thereby producing a high output of 110 PS/7,000 rpm from its compact profile.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Mazda Museum

● Hours open: 8:30–15:30; vary depending on season
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, Mazda’s holidays
● Address: 3-1 Shinchi, Fuchu-cho, Aki-gun, Hiroshima 730-8670
● Tel: +81-82-252-5050
● URL: http://www.mazda.co.jp/philosophy/museum/
● Access: By JR, take Sanyo Line to Mukainada Sta.
About 5 mins. on foot. Reception on 1F of Mazda head office bldg.
By chartered bus (group reservation). Entry from east main gate of Mazda Uzina,
Reception at Mazda Museum


No.6:Collection

Honda CVCC Engine

The Honda CVCC engine was the first in the world to clear the exhaust emission regulation known as the Muskie Act in the United States, which was a severe regulation in the 70s said to be unachievable. In recognition of the achievement, the car equipped with this engine was selected as ‘the Best Engineered Car’ in the 20th century by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). The CVCC engine is designed with the new Lean-Burn concept to achieve complete fuel combustion. The engine included auxiliary combustion chambers and valves for the chambers and was capable of reducing harmful substances contained in the exhaust gas without using a catalyst. In addition, the technology triggered the development of many exhaust gas reduction technologies. It is a very historically important engine that elevated Japan’s exhaust gas reduction technology to the leading position in the world.

On exhibition

Honda Collection Hall

● Hours open: 9:30–17:30 (Vary depending on season/events; please inquiry.)
● Admission fee: Free (additional fee required for entry to Twin Ring Motegi)
● Days closed: See website.
● Address: 120-1 Hiyama, Motegi-machi, Haga-gun, Tochigi 321-3597 In Twin Ring Motegi
● Tel: +81-285-64-0341
● URL: http://www.honda.co.jp/collection-hall/
● Access: 10 mins. by taxi from Motegi Sta., Moka Railway


No.7:Collection

FJR710 Jet Engine

The jet engine FJR710/600S is the first high-bypass ratio turbo-fan engine in Japan that was born under the project ‘Research and Development of Aircraft Jet Engine’ by the then Agency of Industrial Science and Technology, Ministry of International Trade and Industry in 1971. For the research and development project, the National Aerospace Laboratories of Japan (currently the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) handled the element research and operating tests, and IHI Corporation, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. and Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. took charge of design and trial manufacture. The high-altitude performance testing of the engine was executed at then NGTE in England and the advanced technology was authorized, which led to the international jointly developed engine V2500 currently used in the Air Bus A320, etc. The FJR710 jet engine was also used in the short takeoff and landing aircraft ‘ASKA’ of the National Aerospace Laboratories of Japan and served as a foundation for Japan’s civil aviation engines. Main specifications are as follows: thrust force, 4.8 tons; fuel consumption, 0.39 kg/hr/kg; bypass ratio, 6; overall pressure ratio, 19; and weight, 1,080 kg.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

● Hours open: 10:00–17:00
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, and Holidays
● Address: 7-44-1 Jindaiji-higashi-machi, Chofu-shi, Tokyo 182-8522
● Tel: +81-50-3362-2600
● URL: http://global.jaxa.jp/about/centers/
cac/index.html#tours-and-exhibits

● Access: Near ‘Kokenmae’ Bus Stop. By bus from Bus Stop No.8 of south exit of Kichijoji Sta. (for Choufu-eki Kita-guchi), JR Chuo Line

* Apology: There is no full-time docent at the Mechanical Engineering Heritage FJR710; exhibition only (without explanation)
There is a cut model of the same type of engine in the exhibition room.


No.8:Collection

YANMAR Small Horizontal Diesel Engine, Model HB

The Yanmar small horizontal diesel engine, ‘Model HB’ is a diesel engine that was successfully designed for downsizing and commercialization for the first time in the world. Around 1930, among compact internal combustion engines, oil engines were at the height of their prosperity. Magokichi Yamaoka, the founder of Yanmar, was captivated by the superior energy efficiency and safety of a diesel engine he saw at an exhibition in Leipzig, Germany, and he made great efforts toward the development of compact diesel engines.

After overcoming various technical problems, he successfully commercialized the ‘Model HB’, which was without parallel in the world, in December 1933.

The downsized diesel engines were widely employed as power sources in various industrial fields, including agriculture, and contributed to mechanization and modernization not only in Japan, but also various countries around the world.

On exhibition

YANMAR Museum

● Hours open: 10:00–18:00 (Entry closes at 17:00.)
● Admission fee: 600 yen for adults, 300 yen for junior/senior high schoolers. Free for elementary school children or younger (only Yamaoka Magokichi Memorial Room free).
● Days closed: Mondays (the following day if falling on a holiday)
● Address: 6-50 Sanwamachi, Nagahama-shi, Shiga 526-0055
● Tel: +81-7-4962-8887
● URL: https://www.yanmar.com/jp/museum/
● Access: 5 mins. on foot from Nagahama Sta., JR Hokuriku-Honsen


No.9:Collection

Prof. Inokuchi’s CENTRIFUGAL PUMP

The thesis ‘The Theory of Volute Pumps’ released in 1905 by Aria Inokuchi, professor of the then Imperial University of Tokyo, presented a revolutionary theory that attracted attention worldwide at that time. Based on the pump theory, Kazukiyo Hatakeyama, a pupil of Inokuchi, advanced his own research for commercialization. Inokuchi’s centrifugal pump was then manufactured in 1912 by Kunitomo Kikai Seisakusho and it was used up to the mid-1960s to mid-1970s at the Ketanuma Water Pumping Station in Chiba Prefecture. The pump specifications are as follows: diameter, 15 inches (380mm); pump displacement, 4747 koku (856.3m3/hr.); and actual pump head, 12 shaku (3.64m). In 1912, Hatakeyama established the ‘Inokuchi Type Machinery Office’ (currently Ebara Corporation), where Ariya Inokuchi was designated to serve as senior manager. Centrifugal pumps to which Inokuchi’s theory is applied are still manufactured today.

On exhibition

The Museum Meiji-mura

● Hours open: (Mar.–Oct.) 9:30–17:00, (Nov.) 9:30–16:00 (Dec.–Feb.) 10:00–16:00
● Admission fee: 1,700 yen for adults, 1,300 yen for those 65 or older 1,000 yen for high schoolers, 600 yen for elementary/junior high schoolers
● Days closed: Mondays in Dec.–Feb. (Open on holidays, Jan. 1-6), Dec. 31
● Address: 1 Uchiyama, Inuyama-shi, Aichi 484-0000
● Tel: +81-568-67-0314
● URL: http://www.meijimura.com
● Access: 20 mins. by bus for Meijimura from Inuyama Sta., Meitetsu Inuyama Line


No.10:Collection

High-Frequency Generator

Yosami Radio Transmitting Station is a low-frequency wave transmission station that was constructed in 1929 for wireless telecommunications to Europe for the first time in Japan. The transmission equipment was manufactured by Telefunken and AEG in Germany, and the core technology is the high-frequency generator. Among highfrequency generators, the Alexanderson-type one made in the United States is popularly known. The one used in Yosami Transmitting Station was designed by Telefunken and manufactured by AEG. Disassembly and investigation of the internal parts were conducted in March 2006. The generator was assumed to be an inductortype high-frequency generator based on the patent of a German engineer Goldschmidt. The generator produced high frequencies with the following specifications: output, 500 kW, 5.814 KHz at a rotation speed of 1,360 rpm. The total weight of the generator is about 38 tons, making it the world’s largest high-frequency generator for telecommunications.

On exhibition

Yosami Radio Transmitting Station Memorial Museum

● Hours open: 9:00–17:00
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Mondays (the following day if falling on a holiday), year-end/New Year’s holidays
● Address: Floral Garden Yosami, 2-1 Ishiyama, Takasu-cho, Kariya-shi, Aichi 448-0812
● Tel: +81-566-29-4330
● URL: http://www.fg-yosami.com/
● Access: About 7 mins. by taxi from south exit of Kariya Sta.
About 25 mins. by Kariya city public facilities communication bus (free) for Ogakie Sta. from south exit of Kariya Sta.


No.11:Collection

0-Series Tokaido-Shinkansen Electric Multiple Units

On October 1, 1964, the Tokaido-Shinkansen, the world’s first high-speed railway, started operating between Tokyo and Shin-Osaka. In Japan, the track gauge has been 1,067 mm ever since the opening of railway in 1872. However, the Tokaido-Shinkansen was constructed by using a different line, where a standard track gauge of 1,435 mm was adopted to increase transport capacity. This realized stable high-speed travel and a maximum speed of 210 km/h were attained. In addition, conventional railway technologies changed completely, including the development of new signaling systems and the elimination of railroad crossings. This attracted people’s attention to such an extent that the Japanese term ‘Shinkansen’ is used worldwide. The bullet train led the way to increasing the speed of railways in the world.

The four electric units of the O-Series Tokaido-Shinkansen which are preserved and exhibited in the Kyoto Railway Museum are the memorial first units of four models and they traveled approximately 6 million kilometers until their retirement in March 1978.

On exhibition

Kyoto Railway Museum

● Hours open: 10:00–17:30 (No admission after 17:00)
● Admission fee: General admission (18 years and older) 1,200 yen
University and high school students 1,000 yen
Junior high and elementary school students 500 yen
Children (3 years and older) 200 yen
● Days closed: Every Wednesday (open on holidays) Year-end through New-Year season (12/30 to 1/1)
● Address: Kankijicho, Shimogyo-ku, Kyoto
● Tel: +81-75-323-7334
● URL: http://www.kyotorailwaymuseum.jp/en/guide/
● Access: 20 mins. on foot to the west from the central gate of Kyoto Station, JR Lines


No.12:Collection

Class 230 No.233 2-4-2 Steam Tank Locomotive

This is the production model of the first private steam tank locomotive. A total of forty-one locomotives were manufactured by Kisha-Seizo Goshi-Gaisha in Osaka from 1902 to 1909. The locomotive was designed following the example of English A8 Series locomotives which were imported to Japan in large numbers at that time for short-range use. It was highly evaluated owing to its stable performance and ease of maintenance, though foreign-made components were used for the wheels and the axle shafts.

The No. 233 locomotive exhibited in the Kyoto Railway Museum was used as a shunter in the Takasago Works of the defunct Japanese National Railways after being used in different engine depots. Timed with the opening of the Transportation Museum (later the Modern Transportation Museum), the locomotive was restored in Takatori Works in 1962. As the oldest existing steam tank locomotive, it is an absolute treasure. The locomotive was designated as a railway memorial object in 2004.

On exhibition

Kyoto Railway Museum

● Hours open: 10:00–17:30 (No admission after 17:00)
● Admission fee: General admission (18 years and older) 1,200 yen
University and high school students 1,000 yen
Junior high and elementary school students 500 yen
Children (3 years and older) 200 yen
● Days closed: Every Wednesday (open on holidays) Year-end through New-Year season (12/30 to 1/1)
● Address: Kankijicho, Shimogyo-ku, Kyoto
● Tel: +81-75-323-7334
● URL: http://www.kyotorailwaymuseum.jp/en/guide/
● Access: 20 mins. on foot to the west from the central gate of Kyoto Station, JR Lines


No.13:Collection

Japanese made Passenger Airplane Type YS11

the honor of being the No. 1 mass production model (serial number 2003). The airplane made its maiden flight on October 12, 1964, and was handed over to the Civil Aviation Bureau of the then Transport Ministry in 1965 and named ‘Chiyoda II’. From then on, the airplane was used for flight inspection and recorded in excess of 20,000 hours until its final flight in December 1998. The airplane is one of the oldest airframes following the two prototype models and has considerable heritage value. To preserve the airplane in a form closer to the original, the National Science Museum implemented a periodical inspection about four times a year after obtaining up to now. The facility also records such data as chronological changes and maintenance work and collects information regarding the conservation of cultural properties.

Prototype No.1 is exhibited in the Museum of Aeronautical Sciences in Narita, while prototype No.2 has not been preserved. This airplane is the No.3 commercially manufactured one.

* Not exhibited <photo from National Museum of Nature and Science>
* This heritage is not on exhibition. The same type is exhibited at the following location:Museum of Aeronautical Sciences● Hours open: 10:00–17:00 (Entry closes at 16:30.)
● Days closed: Mondays (the following day if falling on a holiday), year-end from Dec. 29 to 31
(Opens every day in Jan., May, Aug.)
● Address: 111-3 Iwayama, Shibayama-machi, Sambu-gun, Chiba 289-1608
● Tel: +81-479-78-0557
● URL: http://www.aeromuseum.or.jp/
● Access: See website.

No.14:Collection

Cub Type F

Honda’s Cub Type F is an auxiliary engine for use with bicycles released in 1952. The Type F engine features a piston valve, a cross-flow scavenging type 2-cycle single cylinder, and an engine displacement of 49.9 cm3; it also boasted a performance of 1 PS/3,000 rpm maximum output. To ensure light weight and high productivity, a number of aluminum die-cast and press parts were used, putting the engine ahead of its time, and the engine achieved the lightest weight of 6 kg as an auxiliary engine for bicycles. The unique design featured ‘a white tank and a red engine’ and the high reliability enabled rapid familiarization, ringing about a considerable transformation in the distribution chain at that time. In addition, this is a historical engine which served as the catalyst for the drastic expansion of the market for motorized bicycles as mass production products, making them the most basic product for development following compact motorcycles.

On exhibition

Honda Collection Hall

● Hours open: 9:30–17:30 (Vary depending on season; please inquire.)
● Admission fee: Free (Additional fee required for entry to Twin Ring Motegi)
● Days closed: See website.
● Address: 120-1 Hiyama, Motegi-machi, Haga-gun, Tochigi 321-3597 In Twin Ring Motegi
● Tel: +81-285-64-0341
● URL: http://www.honda.co.jp/collection-hall/
● Access: 10 mins. by taxi from Motegi Sta., Moka Railway


No.15:Collection

Chain-Stitch sewing machine for the production of straw hats

In the early 1920s, when the Japanese sewing machine market was solely occupied by Singer, brothers Masayoshi and Jitsuichi Yasui, who founded Brother Industries, Ltd. started to develop manufacturing technology for a chain-stitch sewing machine for the production of straw hats. In particular, a heat-treatment method for the surface hardening of sewing machine parts requiring wear resistance and shock resistance was mandatory, but such a method had not yet been disseminated in Japan at that time.

The Yasui brothers established the heat treatment technique of carburizing and quenching as a result of trial and error and they also developed a machining technique for the shuttle (middle) hook, the most important component of a sewing machine. Finally, they completed and launched the durable ‘Showa 3 Chain-Stich Sewing Machine’, whose quality was unsurpassed by foreign-made machines in 1928. The manufacturing technique became the foundation for the growth of Brother Industries.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Brother Communication Space

● Hours open: 10:00–17:00 (Entry closes at 16:30.)
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Sundays, public holidays, Japanese Golden Week holidays, summer holidays, year-end and New Year holidays
● Address: 5-15 Shioiri-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi 467-0851
● Tel: +81-52-824-2227
● URL: http://www.brother.co.jp/bes/
● Access: 2 mins. on foot from Horita Sta. (for Okazaki/Toyohashi), Meitetsu Nagoya Line
– 2 mins. on foot from Horita Sta. Transfer to Meitetsu Nagoya Line (for Okazaki/Toyohashi) at Kanayama Sta., JR Tokaido/Chuo Line
– 3 mins. on foot from Horita Sta., Subway Meijo Line


No.16:Collection

Non-Stop Shuttle Change Toyoda Automatic Loom, Type G

This is a complete automatic loom that Sakichi Toyoda spent his life endeavoring to invent and complete, setting it as his ultimate goal. The loom had the following features: an automatic shuttle changing device, whereby weft yarns are automatically replenished by changing the shuttle without reducing the speed during high-speed operation; an automatic stopping device, which stops the machine when a warp or weft yarn is broken to prevent defective products; and 25 automation, protection, safety and cleaning mechanisms and devices were added which were created with more than 50 of Sakichi’s inventions from his research and ideas, and passed complete commercial test operations covering integrated textile manufacturing in a large scale over a long period of time. Furthermore, productivity was increased by at least 20 times at a bounce and the fabric quality was revolutionarily enhanced by enabling tandem actions among such mechanisms and devices, offering the most sophisticated performance in the world.

Coincidentally, the timing came ahead of an amendment to the Factory Act (which prohibited women and children from working after midnight), as well as ‘measures for streamlining industrial management’, which was a global issue at that time, and the product was received with great expectations. The loom not only relieved the national crisis but also provided a considerable boost of the textile fabric business to the international level, thereby serving as part of the vanguard of industrial modernization in Japan.

This loom is the memorable first machine, significantly contributed to the growth of the textile industry in many countries, including the transfer of technical expertise to Platt Brothers & Company in Britain, constituting the foundation of the formation and growth of the Toyota Group.

On exhibition

Toyota Commemorative Museum of Industry and Technology

● Hours open: 9:30–17:00 (Admission until at 16:30.)
● Admission fee: 500 yen for adults, 300 yen for junior/senior high schoolers, 200 yen for elementary school children. Free for persons aged 65 and older.
● Days closed: Mondays (the following day if falling on a holiday), year-end/New Year’s holidays
● Address: 4-1-35 Noritake-shinmachi, Nishi-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi 451-0051
● Tel: +81-52-551-6115
● URL: http://www.tcmit.org/
● Access: 3 mins. on foot from Sako Sta., Meitetsu Nagoya Line


No.17:Collection

Japanese Made Hand Operated Type Printing Machine

Modern typographical printing originates in the printing machine invented by Gutenberg in Germany in the mid-15th century. This printing machine is a domestic typographical printing model manufactured around 1885. The printing procedures are such that paper is placed on the typesetter on which ink is applied, the upper ‘Tympan’ cover is placed on it, and the typesetter is moved to the pressing area by a leather belt wrapped around the wooden cylinder at the lower part of the main unit. Pressing and printing are done when a lever is manually pulled and the typesetter springs back up when the lever is released. Tomiji Hirano, who manufactured the machine shown here, is a pioneering figure along with his teacher Shozo Motoki of modern type printing in Japan. The Albion type hand-operated type printing machines were used widely in the Meiji Era, and several machines of this type manufactured in Japan still exist. However, with regard to the machine manufactured by the Hirano Type Foundry, only the machine shown here can be confirmed.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Mizuno Printing Museum

● Hours open: 10:00–16:00 on weekdays (closed 12:00 through 13:00) May be not on exhibition during open hours; be sure to call for confirmation.
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, year-end/New Year’s, summer holidays
● Address: 2-9-2 Irifune, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0042
● Tel: +81-3-3551-7595
● URL: http://www.mizunopritech.co.jp
● Access: 7 mins. on foot from Hatchobori Sta., Hibiya Line/Shintomicho Sta., Yurakucho Line; (parking not available)


No.18:Collection

KOMATSU Bulldozer G40

The KOMATSU Bulldozer G40 (Komatsu Type 1 Soil Leveling Machine) is the first bulldozer manufactured in Japan. The machine was created, during World War II, by mounting a dozing blade in front of a gasoline engine tractor that had already been developed and manufactured, in response to a government request to produce heavy earth-moving machinery. Around 1943, the main blade operating system of foreignmade bulldozers was the cable-operating system. For the Komatsu Bulldozer G40, however, the revolutionary hydraulic operating system was used for the first time in the world.

The bulldozer exhibited at Komatsu Techno Center was in service during the war in the Philippines. After the war, one that was dumped into the sea as a result of condemnation by the United States was later salvaged and used on a farm in Australia. The machine was found in 1979, was returned to its homeland of Japan 35 years later, and is exhibited to this day.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Komatsu Techno Center

● Hours open: Please inquire.
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, year-end/New Year’s, summer and other company holidays May not be exhibited on some weekdays; please inquire in advance.
● Address: 697 Tokunaga, Izu-shi, Shizuoka 410-2506
● Tel: +81-558-83-2930
● URL: http://www.komatsu.co.jp/techno/
● Access: 20 mins. by car from Ito Sta., JR Ito Line, or Shuzenji Sta., Izuhakone Railway


No.19:Collection

OLYMPUS GASTROCAMERA GT-Ⅰ

The origin of the Olympus endoscope can be traced back to the development of the gastrocamera executed more than half a century ago. In 1949, a challenge to ‘manufacture a camera that can take pictures inside a patient’s stomach’ was introduced by a doctor at a branch hospital of Tokyo University at that time. The development work was an ongoing process of trial and error in every aspect. The developers resolved a number of technological problems one after another, including the manufacture of an ultra-small lens, development of strong light sources, a search for flexible tube materials for the main unit, acquisition of the best-suited film and thorough investigation of measures for preventing water leakage.

In 1950, the prototype ‘Gastrocamera GT-I’ was born out of the overcoming of these obstacles and became the world’s first gastrocamera. The camera lens is set at the distal end of the flexible tube, photos are taken by illuminating the miniature lamp through hand operations and the film is rewound by pulling it with a wire. This gastrocamera was a revolutionary medical apparatus that laid the foundation for the sophisticated fiber-optic cameras that play an active part of inspection and therapy in medical settings throughout the world today.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Olympus Museum

● Hours open: 8:45–17:30
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, Ishikawa Technology Development Center’s holidays
● Address: 2951 Ishikawa-machi, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-8507 Technology Development Center Hachioji Olympus Museum
● Tel: +81-42-642-3086
● URL: (introduction to historical products on Olympus website: Olympus’s Museum)
http://www.olympus.co.jp/brand/zuikodoh/
exhibition/medical.html

● Access: Take Nishitokyo Bus for Utsukidai via Owada or for Tokai University Hospital from JR Hachioji Sta./ Keio Hachioji Sta. to Kita-hachioji-eki-iriguchi stop


No.20:Collection

Buckton Universal Testing Machine

The Buckton universal testing machine is a British material testing machine manufactured in Britain that was used in universities and heavy industries from the Meiji Era to the Taisho Era. Measurement is conducted by setting off the inclination of a lever produced by a load applied on the test piece by adjusting to horizontal position with the poise weights.

The machine was installed at the Chemical Analysis Section, Kobe Shipyard and Machinery Works of the Mitsubishi Joint-stock Company (the predecessor of Takasago Research & Development Center, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.) in 1908 featuring a measurement capacity of 30 long tons. The loading device is of the screw type. The machine is capable of executing tensile, compression and bending tests. It was used for testing important materials for ships and power engines and made significant contributions toward ensuring the reliability of the products.

The testing machine shown here, which is the oldest at present, is preserved permanently as a precious heritage, showing the origin point of material strength testing in Japan.

On exhibition

Material Strength Laboratory, Takasago Research & Development Center, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries

● Address: 2-1-1 Arai-cho Shinhama Takasago-shi, Hyogo 676-8686


No.21:Collection

All around drafting machine, MUTOH ‘drafter Type MH-Ⅰ’

Japan’s first design and drafting machine, ‘Drafter Type MH-1,’ was invented in 1953 by Yoshiro Mutoh, the founder of ‘MUTOH Memori Chokoku’ (MUTOH Scale Engraving) Ltd., the predecessor of MUTOH Industries, Ltd.* (*Current corporate name Mutoh Holdings Co., Ltd.) The mechanism of the drafter is not the ‘ladder type parallel-arm system’ seen in foreign-made products at that time, but rather an original ‘belt-pulley system’. This system enables the maintaining of parallelism with a high degree of accuracy without regard for parallelism adjustment, which helped make the basic work of manufacturing and drafting work faster and provided a great boost toward precision work. The ‘Drafter Type MH-1’ is the prototype of the arm-type ‘Drafter SAU-85.’ While the scale material was changed from metal to resin, and balance adjustment and contact degree adjustment functions were added to enhance user-friendliness, the machine’s basic performance carries the advanced technical level of the time to this day.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

MUTOH Showroom

● Hours open: 9:00–17:00
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, year-end/New Year’s holidays
● Address: 3-1-3 Ikejiri, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 154-8560
● Tel: +81-3-6758-7123
● URL: http://www.mutoh.co.jp/
● Access: 3 mins. on foot from Ikejiri-ohashi Sta. (west exit), Tokyo Den-en-toshi Line


No.22:Collection

Man-nen Jimeisho

The perpetual clock, officially ‘Man-nen Jimeisho’ (mechanical stand clock), is a mechanical Japanese-style clock (telling time in temporal hours) that was designed and manufactured by Hisashige Tanaka, also known as ‘Karakuri (gimmick) Giemon’, the founder of Toshiba Corporation, in 1851. One ‘Koku’ is determined by respectively dividing day and night time into six based on dawn and dusk. The clock can not only vary the length of one Koku according to seasons, but also can be automatically activated by winding the spiral spring once a year, while associating the time-indication piece with the season. The clock has a celestial globe on the top part, and six time-indicating areas on the lower part, including the piece-split type Japanese style clock, an entry panel of 24 seasonal turning points, an indication panel for Shichiyo (seven days of the week) and the number of time strikes, a date indication panel according to Jikkan (The Ten Stems) and Junishi (the Twelve Signs of the Chinese Zodiac), a lunar age indication panel and a Western clock. The clock can be said to be the fruit of artisanship, comprising not only the originality of the mechanism, but also the beautiful decorations such as the lacquer work, mother-of-pearl inlay and metal carving.

On exhibition

National Museum of Nature and Science

● Hours open: 9:00–17:00 (Entry closes at 16:30.), 9:00–20:00 on Fridays * May be extended for special exhibitions.
● Admission fee: 600 yen for general guests/college students, free for high schoolers or younger
● Days closed: Mondays (Tuesday if Sunday or Monday falls on holidays), year-end/New Year’s holidays (Dec. 28–Jan. 1)
● Address: 7-20 Ueno Koen, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-8718
● Tel: +81-3-5777-8600
● URL: http://www.kahaku.go.jp/english/userguide/
access/

● Access: 5 mins. on foot from JR Ueno Sta. park exit
10 mins. on foot from Ueno Sta., Ginza Line/Hibiya Line
5 mins. on foot from Keisei Ueno Sta., Keisei Line


No.23:Collection

The Chikugo River Railway Lift Steel Bridge

The Chikugo River Railway Lift Steel Bridge is a railroad bridge of the Saga Line of the old Japan National Railways opened in 1935. The bridge, 507.2 m long in total, is the oldest existing lift bridge and has been the largest in scale in Asia since its construction (a scale model was exhibited at the Paris Exposition in 1937). The bridge system consists of wire ropes arranged in the movable 24-m-long, 48ton beam and in the 30-m-high hoisting tower, being winded up with the motor set at one side. The system was especially invented and designed for this bridge, and the elevation and speed were the highest in Japan at that time.

The railway was abolished in 1987, and the defunct track site was rebuilt as a walking trail at a later date. The moving beams at the center were preserved in working condition for sightseeing. The bridge was nationally designated as an Important Cultural Property in 2003.

On exhibition

Over Oaza Mukaijima, Okawa-shi, Fukuoka Over Morodomi-cho Oaza Tameshige, Saga-shi, Saga

● Hours open: 9:00–17:00
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Mondays If Monday falls on a holiday, closed the following day
● Address: Oaza Mukaijima, Okawa-shi, Fukuoka Morodomi-cho Oaza Tameshige, Saga-shi, Saga
● Tel: +81-944-87-9919 (Chikugo River Vertical Lift Bridge Tourism Bureau)
● Access: Get off at Nishitetsu Yanagawa Sta., take bus to Chikugo-gawa Shokaikyo stop (1 min. on foot)
Get off at JR Saga Sta., take bus for Yanagawa (to Morodomi-bashi stop; 10 mins. on foot)


No.24:Documents

A Group of Publications by JSME in its Early Days

– The First Issue of Journal of the Society of Mechanical Engineers December 1897
This is the first issue of Volume 1 of the ‘Academic Journal of SME’ first published in December 1897, by SME, which was established in 1897. The publication includes twelve editorials and published reports, three excerpts of patents, etc. and played the role of providing opportunities for transmitting and receiving information for domestic mechanical engineers.

– Collection of Mechanical Engineering Technical Terms (Vol. 1 to Vol. 5) 1901 to 1924
The Collection of Mechanical Engineering Technical Terms was compiled over the course of 25 years. The editing policy is to compile simple and easy-to-pronounce terms. The entire books are divided into sectoral volumes, and it can also be said that the collection established the foundation for enabling the transfer of foreign technologies into Japan using Japanese language.

– Mechanical Engineering Handbook 1934
This is an integrated achievement of mechanical engineering and technologies (A6 size, 704 pages) that was published over eight years and was the largest project of JSME since its foundation.

On exhibition

The Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers bureau/exhibit room

● Hours open: 9:00–16:30
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, year-end/New Year’s holidays
● Address: 5F Shinanomachi Rengakan, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-0016
● Tel: +81-3-5360-3500
● URL: http://www.jsme.or.jp/
● Access: 1 min. on foot from Shinanomachi Sta., JR Line


No.25:Documents

Lecture Note ‘Hydraulics and Hydraulic Machinery’ by Professors Bunji MANO and Ariya INOKUTY at Imperial University of Tokyo

These documents are lecture notes of the Technical College, Faculty of Engineering, Imperial University of Tokyo, made in 1905.

The first note is ‘Hydraulics and Hydraulic Machinery’, the first half of which, ‘Hydraulics’, was written by Professor Ariya Inokuchi, the inventor of Inokuchi’s centrifugal pump. The second half, ‘Hydraulic Machinery’, was written by Professor Bunji Mano, who founded the Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1897 and assumed the office of the first secretary general (chairman). The notes are a testament to the high level of lectures at that time through information, handouts of examination questions, etc.

The second note is the ‘Mathematics II’ and the lecturer is unknown and not indicated, but the contents cover the mathematical analysis (differential calculus, integral calculus and differential equation). The transcriber is Mr. Tsuneka Odamura, who graduated the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering of the university in 1906, and the notes were preserved by his son, Shiro Odamura (former president of Takushoku University).

On exhibition

The Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers bureau/exhibit room

● Hours open: 9:00–16:30
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, year-end/New Year’s holidays
● Address: 5F Shinanomachi Rengakan, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-0016
● Tel: +81-3-5360-3500
● URL: http://www.jsme.or.jp/
● Access: 1 min. on foot from Shinanomachi Sta., JR Line


No.26:Site

Sankyozawa Power Station and Related Objects

The Sankyozawa Power Station is the hydroelectric power station which Miyagi Boseki Co., Ltd. started lights on electric lights through hydroelectric generation in 1888 for the first time in Japan, and the brick structure has survived along with traces of the original water channel. The existing power station has continued operating since 1910 and the building is designated as a registered tangible cultural property. The power generator was made by Siemens AG in 1924 and it is still in service, as it partly retains the original shape. In the adjacent ‘Sankyozawa 100year Electric Historical Center’, a 5kW DC power generator designed by the Imperial College of Engineering, of the same type as the original generator, is preserved and exhibited.

On exhibition

Sankyozawa 100year Electric Historical Center Tohoku Electric Power Co., Inc.

● Hours open: 10:00–16:00
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: See website.
● Address: 16 Aza Sankyozawa, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi 980-0845
● Tel: +81-22-261-5935
● URL: http://www.tohoku-epco.co.jp/fureai/pr/sankyo/
● Access: 15 mins. by car from JR Sendai Sta. 3 mins. on foot from Sankyozawa-kotsu-koen stop, Sendai City Bus


No.27:Site

A Hydraulic Lock and a Floating Steam Crane in Miike Port

The Port of Miike in Omuta, Fukuoka Prefecture, was built in 1908 as a coal port for Mitsui Miike Coal Mine. This is a lock-type port, very unique in Japan, adopted by engineers at that time, including Takuma Dan (Chairman of later Mitsui Gomei Kaisha) to allow large ships to travel to and from the Ariake Sea where is a significant tidal range. In addition, the steam-driven floating crane ‘Dai Kongo Maru’ is in service in the inner harbor. This is an extremely precious site where mechanical engineering technologies of the coal industry that made a great contribution to the modernization of Japan in the Meiji Era and thereafter remain.

Lock: On exhibition
Crane: Off exhibitionPort of Miike● Hours open: 8:00–16:30
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, year-end/New Yearʼs, Bon holidays, etc.
● Address: 1 Shinko-machi, Omuta-shi, Fukuoka 836-0061
● Tel: +81-944-57-3105 (Administration Div., Logistics Company, Mitsui Mining)
● Access: 10 mins. by taxi or bus for Miike-ko from JR Omuta Sta.

No.28:Collection

An Omnibus ʻEntaroʼ (Ford TT type)

The Tokyo Municipal Electric Bureau urgently imported the chassis of motor trucks made by Ford in bulk, as substitutes for the municipal electric railway cars damaged by the Great Kanto earthquake in 1923, thereby overcoming the challenge by refurbishing the trucks into buses. The name ‘Entaro’ derives from Rakugo performer Entaro Tachibanaya and his performance, ‘Entaro Carriage’, who played the trumpet of omnibus in the early Meiji Era, as the buses resembled that carriage. The omnibus was donated in 1955 to the Transportation Museum from Kashiwa Gakuen, to which it had been transferred for preservation and exhibition. This is the only existing omnibus ‘Entaro’ and it is the oldest existing bus in Japan.

Off exhibition

The Railway Museum

● Address: 3-47 Onari-cho, Omiya-ku, Saitama-shi, Saitama 330-0852
● Inquiry about photos: The Railway Museum +81-48-651-0088
● Inquiry about materials: The Railway Museum +81-48-651-0088


No.29:Collection

Mechanical Telecommunication Devices (Made by SHINKO SEISAKUSHO Co., Ltd.)

This keyboard type punching machine was developed for the first time in Japan, after the specifications were changed to actual kana character type from the Morse acoustic communication system for restoring the domestic communication network in accordance with a GHQ directive. Shinko Seisakusho Co., Ltd. had been one of the leading manufacturers of mechanical telecommunication devices until Showa 40s, and their devices including telex machines which held 100% share in Japan during the initial stage of service constitute precious instrumental information materials that supported information-sharing and telecommunications during the postwar years of recovery in Japan before telecommunication systems were changed to electronic types.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Shinko Mechatro Tech Co., Ltd.

● Hours open: 10:00–16:00
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, year-end/New Yearʼs, Bon holidays, etc.
● Address: 92-6 Dai 9 Jiwari, Ohata, Hanamaki-shi, Iwate 025-0354
● Tel: +81-198-26-4311
● URL: http://www.shinko-exc.co.jp/
● Access: About 15 mins. by car from Shin-Hanamaki Sta., Tohoku Shinkansen Line


No.30:Collection

Mechanical Calculator, ʻJIDOSOROBANʼ

This ‘JIDOSOROBAN’ is the oldest domestic mechanical calculator. It was invented by Ryoichi Yazu in 1902 and started being manufactured after being patented in a year after. The device is of a gear type, comprising one cylinder and 22 gears, and it features a unique mechanism wherein the binary system and the quinary system are employed for data entry, as is the case with an abacus. The calculator showed excellent performance, superior to foreign-made calculators at that time, including automatic shifting and automatic stopping functions.

The calculator was sold to government offices, and other entities at a price of 250 yen per unit. This first calculator manufactured in Japan is a precious machine that featured unique technologies and led the way in the use of domestic calculating machines.

On exhibition

Kitakyushu Literature Museum

● Hours open: 9:30–18:00 (Entry closes at 30 mins. before closing time.) May be off exhibition for certain reasons; please be sure to call for confirmation.
● Admission fee: Permanent exhibit: 200 yen for adults, 100 yen for junior/senior high schoolers, 50 yen for elementary school children
● Days closed: Monday (the following day if falling on a holiday), year-end/New Yearʼs holidays, inventory days, etc.
● Address: 4-1 Jonai, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu-shi, Fukuoka 803-0813
● Tel: +81-93-571-1505
● URL: http://www.kitakyushucity-bungakukan.jp/
● Access: 15 mins. on foot from JR Kokura Sta., 10 mins. on foot from JR Nishi-Kokura Sta.


No.31:Collection

Domestic induction motor and design sheet in the business start age of Japanese Electrical Machinery

These are 5-horsepower, three-phase induction motors manufactured in the earliest days of electrical machinery in Japan and the design sheet thereof, which are currently preserved in Odaira Memorial Museum in Hitachi Works of Hitachi, Ltd. in Hitachishi, Ibaraki prefecture. The motor is a memorial product that was designed and manufactured in 1910 by using solely domestic technologies under the leadership of Namihei Odaira, Section Manager, Engineering Department, Kuhara Kogyo, Hitachi Mine, and it carries the nameplate ‘Serial No. 1.’ The design sheet was prepared by Naosaburo Takao. These historical properties show a high level of domestic electrical machinery manufacturing technologies from the early 20th century.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Odaira Memorial Museum, Hitachi Ltd.

● Hours open: 10:00–12:00, 13:00–16:00
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Office holidays (Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, year-end/New Yearʼs, Bon holidays, etc.)
● Address: 3-1-1 Saiwai-cho, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki 317-8511
● Tel: +81-294-21-1111
● Access: 20 mins. on foot from Kaigan exit of JR Hitachi Sta.


No.32:Site

Mechanical Device of Sapporo Clock Tower

The clock tower was built in 1881 at the drill hall of the former Sapporo Agricultural College constructed in 1878. It can be said to be the oldest existing one (the mechanical part) out of those currently in operation. The mechanical part was made in the United States, while the clock bell was casted in Engineering Works, the Ministry of Industry. The clock tower can be said to be built in the pioneer days of combining domestic and foreign products. The mechanical parts of the clock have been adequately maintained and managed, and the clock tower itself is also a significant building as a landmark.

On exhibition

Sapporo Clock Tower

● Hours open: 8:45–17:10 (Entry closes at 17:00.)
● Admission fee: 200 yen for adults (Free for high schoolers or younger), 180 yen for groups (20 persons or more)
● Days closed: New Yearʼs holidays (Jan.1–3)
● Address: Kita 1-jo Nishi 2-chome, Chuo-ku, Sapporo-shi 060-0001
● Tel: +81-11-231-0838
● URL: http://sapporoshi-tokeidai.jp/
● Access: 10 mins. on foot from south exit, JR Sapporo Sta.
5 mins. on foot from City Hall exit, Odori Sta., city subway Namboku/Tozai/Toho Line


No.33:Landmark

Minegishi Watermill

This watermill, called ‘Shin Guruma’, constitutes a rice- and flour-milling plant that operated from about 1808 to 1968. In this plant, machinery including a watermill (4.6 m in diameter), mills for rice and flour milling, a planar sifting machine, an elevator and wooden-toothed gears are preserved as a system just as they were in use at that time. You can see with your own eyes the masterly artisan skills shown in the wooden machinery from the end of the Edo Era to the Taisho Era, rural factory systems, as well as how people lived at the watermill, along with a farmhouse built adjacent to the mill. There are a variety of preservation and succession activities for the watermill, including explanation activities by citizens and comprehensive study programs for children.

On exhibition (Reservation required for groups of 10 persons or more)

Water Mill Farmhouse at Nogawa River, Musashino area

● On exhibition: 10:00–16:00 (Entry closes at 15:50.)
● Admission fee: 100 yen (Free for junior high schoolers or younger)
● Days closed: Wednesdays (the following day if falling on a holiday), year-end/New Yearʼs holidays (Dec. 28–Jan. 4)
● Address: 6-10-15 Osawa, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-0015
● Tel: +81-422-45-1151 (ext. 2921) (Lifelong Learning Sec., Mitaka City)
● URL: http://www.city.mitaka.tokyo.jp/suisya/index.html (In Japanese)
● Access: 5 mins. on foot from Ryusenji Bus Stop (for Asahi-cho-sancho-me or Kuruma-gaeshi Danchi to Ryusenji Bus Stop from Mitaka Sta., JR Chuo Line)


No.34:Collection

The Master Worm Wheel of the Hobbing Machine HRS-500

The master worm wheel of the hobbing machine HRS-500 manufactured by Shibarura Machine Works Co., Ltd. is a high-precision gear cutter capable of cutting large gears 5,000 mm in diameter. The seventh master worm wheel machined by the hobbing machine itself boasts the world’s highest precision, with a maximum accumulated pitch error of 4/1,000 mm. The large hobbing machines manufactured using this machine are used for cutting large reduction gears for ship turbines still today. No gear exceeding such precision has been manufactured to date.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Toshiba Machine Co., Ltd.

● Hours open: 9:00–16:00 (Entry closes at 15:30.)
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holiday, year-end/New Yearʼs, Bon holidays, etc.
● Address: 2068-3 Ooka, Numazu-shi, Shizuoka 410-8510
● Tel: +81-55-926-5141
● URL: http://www.toshiba-machine.co.jp/
● Access: 5 mins. by taxi from JR Numazu Sta. 15 mins. by taxi from JR Mishima Sta. (recommended, as bullet train is available)


No.35:Collection

Locomobile, The Oldest Private Steam Automobile in JAPAN

This is the first automobile for commercial use in Japan which was imported from the United States in 1902 and is the only one existing today. Baron Ryokichi Kawada, who was the president of Yokohama Dock Co., Ltd. at that time, purchased the automobile for commuting to the company. He became the president of Hakodate Dock Co. later on and used the automobile for coming and going between his residence in Hakodate city and his farming plant of ‘Danshaku’ potatoes.

This is a high-performance car that graces the opening page of Japan’s automobile history. As a steam automobile, it boasts being a top-end machine right before the shift to gasoline-fueled cars and can be said to be the base of the rise of automobiles in Japan. In 1980, the automobile was fully restored to a condition enabling self-travel.

Off exhibition

Danshaku History Museum

● Hours open: 9:00–17:00
● Admission fee: 500 yen for adults, 300 yen for elementary/junior high schoolers, 300 yen for persons aged 70 or older, group discount offered (5 persons or more)
● Days closed: No days closed in Mar.–Nov. (closes in Dec.–Feb.)
● Address: 4-3-1 Tobetsu, Hokuto-shi, Hokkaido 049-0282
● Tel: +81-138-21-1177
● URL: http://www.danshakuimo.com/
● Access: 3 mins. on foot from Oshima-Tobetsu Sta., JR Line


No.36:Collection

Arrow-Gou, The Oldest Japanese-made Car

This car was completed by Koichi Yano (1892–1975) in 1916. It is preserved in working condition at Fukuoka City Museum and is the oldest existing Japanese-made car that can travel. Excluding only a small number parts, all components were manufactured using domestic parts. Although only one car was manufactured, it constitutes the technical base for manufacturing special cars, including the development of Japan’s first refrigerated car by Yano at a later date. The car is very important in terms of the history of the automobile industry, considering the rise of the special automobile industry in subsequent years.

On exhibition

Fukuoka City Museum

● Hours open: 9:30–17:30 (Entry closes at 17:00.)
● Admission fee: 200 yen for adults, 150 yen for high school/college students *free for junior high schoolers or younger
● Days closed: Mondays (the following day if falling on a holiday), year-end/New Yearʼs holidays (Dec. 28–Jan. 4)
● Address: 3-1-1 Momochihama, Sawara-ku, Fukuoka-shi, Fukuoka 814-0001
● Tel: +81-92-845-5011
● URL: http://museum.city.fukuoka.jp/
● Access: 15 mins. on foot Nishijin Sta. from city subway; 35 mins. by Nishitetsu Bus from Hakata Sta.; 20 mins. by Nishitetsu Bus from Tenjin Sta.


No.37:Collection

British-made 50ft Turn Table

This 50-foot turntable was manufactured by Ransomes & Rapier in England in 1897 and is the oldest existing British-made equipment available in Japan whose manufacturing site is identified. The beam side is of a fish-belly shape and the turntable type is a ‘Balanced Type’ upper-deck type. While in a turning operation, the locomotive loads and the turntable beam are supported by the center portion only. This is one of 15 turntables of the same design delivered to Nippon Railway and it is back in service after being relocated to the station yard of Senzu Station of Oigawa Railway Co., Ltd. from the station yard of Higashi Akatani Station of Japan National Railways. Another two turntables assumed to be made in England at different times exist today in Japan, but the histories of such turntables are unknown.

On exhibition

Within Senzu Sta., Oigawa Railway Co., Ltd.

● Hours open: 9:00–17:00
● Admission fee: 150 yen (for both adults/children) (ticket for entry to Senzu Sta. required)
● Days closed: No days closed
● Address: 1216-5 Senzu, Kawanehon-cho, Haibara-gun, Shizuoka 428-0411 In Senzu Sta., Oigawa Railway
● Tel: +81-547-59-2065
● URL: http://oigawa-railway.co.jp/
● Access: 0 min. on foot from Senzu Sta., Oigawa Railway


No.38:Landmark

ʻCarousel El Doradoʼ of Toshimaen

The oldest game machine among those that exist today in Japan and one of the oldest class machines in the world is the ‘Carousel El Dorado’ in Toshimaen. The carousel was made in 1907 by a German, Hugo Haase, who was highly renowned as a design engineer of carousels. This is a globally precious cultural heritage, having a history of 100 years or more as the mechanically driven artistic ride-on type.

The carousel has three stages, with different rotating speeds, and the hand-carved wooden horses and gondola present a beautiful example of a fusion of the ornamentation of art nouveau in the early 20th century and mechanical craftsmanship. The carousel offers enjoyment and a touch of fantasy not only to people in Japan, but also to those throughout the world, and thus continues to make a fine contribution to enhancing people’s lives.

On exhibition

Toshimaen

● Hours open: 10:00–17:00 (vary depending on seasons)
● Admission fee: 1,000 yen for adults (junior high schooler or older), 500 yen for children (age 3 to elementary schoolers), free for children 2 or younger
* 300 yen additionally for Carousel El Dorado
* Restriction: Children less than 110 cm tall must be accompanied by an adult (aged 20 or older/admission fee will be charged.)
● Days closed: Tuesdays, Wednesday, regular holidays (Opens on public holidays, during school holidays)
● Address: 3-25-1 Koyama, Nerima-ku, Tokyo 176-8531
● Tel: +81-3-3990-8800
● URL: http://www.toshimaen.co.jp/
● Access: 14 mins. by Seibu Ikebukuro Line, from Ikebukuro without transfer;
20 mins. by Toei Oedo Line, from Shinjuku without transfer; by Seibu Yurakucho Line, transfer at Nerima Sta.
to Toshimaen Sta.; nearby on foot


No.39:Landmark

Old Konpira Oshibai Kabuki Theater (ʻKanamaruzaʼ) revolving stage and its slewing mechanism

The Old Konpira Oshibai Kabuki Theater is the oldest existing wooden theater playhouse building in Japan, built in 1835, and is still in service today. The revolving stage has a total weight of two to three tons and a diameter of 7.3 meters. To rotate it lightly and quietly with the force of four persons, it includes a mechanism called a rotary top. The rotary top is comparable to present-day roller bearings, wherein 78 wooden rollers with a diameter of 120 millimeters are arranged in a circular shape. The revolving mechanism can be referred to as the primogenitor of today’s revolution seat bearing and shows the excellence in mechanical techniques of Japan in the Edo period. In addition, it is a valuable heritage in terms of technology and culture as a mechanical device that contributed to the development of traditional arts in Japan.

On exhibition

Kotohira Elementary School Old Konpira Oshibai Kabuki Theater (Kanamaruza)

● Hours open: 9:00–17:00
● Admission fee: 500 yen for adults, 300 yen for junior/senior high schoolers, 200 yen for elementary schoolers
● Days closed: event dates
● Address: 1241 Kotohira-cho, Nakatado-gun, Kagawa 766-0001
● Tel: +81-877-73-3846
● URL: http://www.town.kotohira.kagawa.jp/
● Access: 20 mins. on foot from Kotohira Sta., JR Line


No.40:Collection

TAMA Electric Vehicle (E4S-47 Ⅰ)

Immediately after World War II when the supply of gasoline was very unstable owing to supply restrictions, this vehicle started being developed with a focus on electric power having sufficient supply capacity and was completed in 1947. It was structured with a wooden frame covered with iron sheets. The electric motor specifications are 36 volts and 120 amperes, and the 40-volt, 162-ampere battery is divided into two parts to be installed on the lower part of the chassis. The maximum speed was 35km/h and the traveling distance with a fully charged battery was 65km.

The vehicle is an important real educational tool showing that a technology abandoned in the past can become necessary someday, and that a product can end with only temporary success unless a system of social acceptance is in place.

On exhibition

Nissan Gallery Global Headquarters

● Hours open: 10:00–20:00
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: See website for irregular dates.
● Address: 1-1-1 Takashima, Nishi-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 220-8686
● Tel: +81-45-523-5555
● URL: http://www.nissan.co.jp/GALLERY/HQ/
● Access: from central passage of Yokohama Sta., JR/Keikyu Lines, to east exit, 7 mins. on foot (across Hamamirai Walk) 5 mins. on foot from Shin-Takashima Sta. (Exit 2), Minatomirai Line
* May be off exhibition for use for an event; please check in advance.


No.41:Collection

Forklift Truck

This is a forklift of the internal-combustion engine type developed for the first time in Japan by ‘Toyo Unpanki Kabushiki Kaisha’ (currently Mitsubishi Logisnext Co., Ltd.) in 1949. It features an automotive gasoline engine and transmission manufactured in Japan with the following specifications: weight 3,200kg; maximum lifting load 2,700kg; and maximum lift 3.05m. It is a counter-balance type, where stability during loading and unloading is ensured by a weight mounted at the back end of the chassis and the weight of engine. This forklift is the heritage to be the norm of mechanical technologies, as it has the fundamental mechanisms widely used in present-day forklifts, including forks operated up and down with hydraulic cylinders, loading and unloading operation devices and direction changeover devices of rear wheels.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Shiga Plant, Mitsubishi Logisnext Co., Ltd.

● Hours open: Please make an inquiry.
● Admission fee: Free (Please make an inquiry.)
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, year-end/New Yearʼs, Bon holidays, etc.
● Address: 578 Chokoji-cho, Omihachiman-shi, Shiga 523-0013
● Tel: +81-748-37-6700
● URL: http://www.logisnext.com/
● Access: 10 mins. by taxi from Omihachiman Sta., JR Line


No.42:Collection

Takasago and Ebara type Centrifugal Refrigerating Machine

The No. 1 and the No. 2 units (180 refrigeration tons) of the Takasago and Ebara type centrifugal refrigerating machine that opened up the history of the large-size refrigerator were installed in the Asahi Building (14,917 m2 ) in Osaka City in 1931.

The oldest existing Takasago and Ebara type centrifugal refrigerating machine was installed in Hino Works of Rokuousha (currently Konica Minolta Holdings) in 1937. It was removed in 1974 after having been used for a long period of time and is currently exhibited in the Research & Development Center of Takasago Thermal Engineering.

On exhibition

Research & Development Center, Takasago Thermal Engineering

● Hours open: 9:00–16:00 (Entry closes at 15:30.)
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, year-end/New Yearʼs, Bon holidays, etc.
● Address: 3150 Iiyama, Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0213
● Tel: +81-46-248-2752
● URL: http://www.tte-net.com/solution/lab.html
● Access: 20 mins. by Kanachu Bus from Hon-Atsugi Sta., Odakyu Line


No.43:Collection

Automated Ticket Gate

This Automated Ticket Gate PG-D120 was developed uniquely by OMRON TATEISI ELECTRONICS CO (currently OMRON Corporation) after a number of trials started in 1967 and it is the world’s first automated ticket gate, of which only the mechanical part remains today.

The model 3S2PG was used at terminal stations ‘Kaizuka’ and ‘Mizuma’ of Mizuma Railway until 2009 and is the oldest existing automated ticket gate kept in perfect operating condition.

The world’s first automated ticket gate system was produced by combining the best mechanical technologies in Japan, with a skillful fusion of electrical and electronic technologies and machine mechanisms. The machines have drastically improved speed and labor-saving for ticket inspection work at stations, and the convenience for users as well, thereby continuing to make a significant contribution to society and people’s everyday lives.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Omron Communication Plaza

● Hours open: 10:00–16:00 (Entry closes at 15:30.)
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, Omronʼs holidays
● Address: Horikawa-higashi-iru, Shiokoji-dori, Shimogyo-ku, Kyoto-shi 600-8530 in Omron Kyoto Center Bldg. Kenshinkan
● Tel: +81-75-344-6092
● URL: http://www.omron.co.jp/about/promo/
showroom/plaza/

● Access: Get off at JR Kyoto Sta.; 5 mins. on foot from Karasuma-chuo exit/west exit (Nanbokujiyutsuro (Pedestrian Walkway) side)
Get off at Kyoto Sta., subway Karasuma Line; about 7 mins. on foot from central exit
Get off at Kyoto Sta., Kintetsu Railway; about 5 mins. on foot from Kintetsu-chuo exit through Nanbokujiyutsuro (Pedestrian walkway)
About 5 mins. from Kyoto Sta. Karasuma-guchi Bus Terminal


No.44:Landmark

Seikan Train Ferry and Moving Rail Bridge

The Seikan Train Ferry was in service for 720,000 navigations over 80 years until the opening of the Seikan Tunnel in March 1988. Since the service started in 1908, 160 million passengers and 250 million tons of freight were transported. It began transportation of vehicles in 1925. The moving rail bridges were built at Aomori and Hakodate ports and part of the facilities at the time remains today. In addition, the final ship serving the ‘Hakkoda-Maru’ route is preserved on the Aomori side and the ‘Mashu-Maru’ on the Hakodate side. The journey logbooks, photos showing the transition of shipbuilding, design drawings, etc. are also preserved. All such materials can be said to be monuments to engineers who served to stabilize and streamline transportation.

On exhibition

Seikan Ferry Memorial Ship HakkodaMaru

● Hours open: 9:00–19:00 (Entrance closes at 18:00) Apr. 1–Oct. 31 9:00–17:00 (closes at 16:30) Nov. 1–Mar. 31
Feel free to observe outside Hakkoda–Maru, Moving Rail Bridge
● Admission fee: 500 yen for adults, 300 yen for junior/senior high schoolers, 100 yen for elementary school children
● Days closed: (i) Mondays (the following day if falling on a holiday) Nov. 1–Mar. 31: (ii) Dec. 31, Jan. 1; (iii) 2nd Monday to Friday in Mar.
● Address: Over 112-15 Yanagawa 1-chome, Aomori-shi, Aomori 038-0012
● Tel: +81-17-735-8150
● URL: http://aomori-hakkoudamaru.com/
● Access: 5 mins. on foot from Aomori Sta., JR Line

Seikan Ferry Memorial Ship MashuMaru

● Hours open: 8:30–18:00 (Entry closes at 17:00) 9:00-17:00 (Entry closes at 16:00) Nov. 1–Mar. 31
Feel free to observe outside Mashu-Maru, Moving Rail Bridge
● Admission fee: 500 yen for adults, 250 yen for children
● Days closed: No days closed (May close temporarily)
● Address: 12 Wakamatsu-cho, Hakodate-shi, Hokkaido 040-0063
● Tel: +81-138-27-2500
● URL: http://www.mashumaru.com/
● Access: 4 mins. on foot from Hakodate Sta., JR Line


No.45:Collection

Type ED15 Electric Locomotive

The Type ED15 electric locomotive is the first purely domestic freight and passenger-use electric locomotive which Namihei Odaira, the founder of Hitachi Ltd., designed and developed with full corporate technical capabilities as a project associated with the electrification plan of the Tokaido Line. The electrical parts were designed and manufactured at Hitachi Works (Ibaraki Prefecture) and the mechanical parts at Kasado Works (Yamaguchi Prefecture). The electric locomotives were used for at least 35 years since 1924 for the Tokaido Line and the Chuo Line.

The electric locomotive is the only existing car of its type and is a heritage situated at the origin of domestic electric locomotives, which replaced steam locomotives as a result of the electrification of railways.

Off exhibition (in principle)

Mito Works, Hitachi

● Address: 1070 Ichige, Hitachinaka-shi, Ibaraki 312-8506
● Tel: +81-29-276-6636


No.46:Collection

Silk reeling machines of the Okaya Silk Museum

The Okaya Silk Museum features eight yarn-making machines, including Frenchtype silk reeling machines and Suwa-type silk reeling machines manufactured in the early Meiji Era, as well as multi-yarn type silk reeling machines developed in the early Showa Era.

The French-type silk reeling machine was used at the government-operated Tomioka Silk Mill in 1872 and is the oldest existing yarn-making machine. It was imported by foreign employee Paul Brunat from Franch. The Suwa-type silk reeling machine was developed by Daijiro Takei of Nakayama Company in Hirano Village, Suwa-gun (presently Okaya City) around 1882 by fusing French and Italian technologies and was disseminated throughout the nation in the Meiji Era. In addition, three multi-yarn type silk reeling machines of the Minorikawa, Oda and Masuzawa types where the productivity is further enhanced are also preserved.

These silk reeling machines are important heritages that testify to the history of silkreeling technologies in Japan.

On exhibition

Okaya Silk Museum

● Hours open: 9:00–17:00
● Admission fee: 500 yen for adults, 300 yen for middle and high school and 150 yen for elementary school
● Days closed: Wednesdays, days following holidays, Dec. 29–Jan. 3
● Address: 1-10-4 Gohda, Okaya-shi, Nagano 394-0021
● Tel: +81-266-23-3489
● URL: http://www.silkfact.jp/
● Access: 25 mins. on foot from Okaya Sta., JR Line 5 mins. by car from Okaya Interchange, Nagano Expressway


No.47:Collection

Toyoda Power Loom

This is the oldest existing narrow-width power loom for cotton cloth and it was invented by Sakichi Toyoda in 1897. The machine is a wood–iron hybrid power loom, the major moving parts of which, such as gear wheels and shafts, are made of iron and the frame of which is made of wood. It features automatic devices such as the broken weft automatic stopping device and a warp feeding device, and brought about a revolution in improving productivity and the quality of fabric. Thanks to productivity 20 times that of conventional handlooms and a low cost of about 1/20th of foreignmade loom, it was widely disseminated throughout the country, significantly bolstering the cotton fabric industry in Japan.

The power loom is a heritage that shows the excellence of domestic technologies and it contributed to the development of textile machinery technologies in Japan.

On exhibition

Toyota Commemorative Museum of Industry and Technology

● Hours open: 9:30–17:00 (Admission until at 16:30.)
● Admission fee: 500 yen for adults, 300 yen for junior/senior high schoolers, 200 yen for elementary school children. Free for persons aged 65 and older.
● Days closed: Mondays (the following day if falling on a holiday), year-end/New Yearʼs holidays
● Address: 4-1-35 Noritake-shinmachi, Nishi-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi 451-0051
● Tel: +81-52-551-6115
● URL: http://www.tcmit.org/
● Access: 3 mins. on foot from Sako Sta., Meitetsu Nagoya Line


No.48:Collection

Hydraulic Excavator UH03

The Model UH03 is a pure domestic hydraulic excavator produced for the first time in Japan and was developed by Hitachi, Ltd. (currently Hitachi Construction Machinery Co., Ltd.). Before that, the single-pump type produced through technical cooperation with European countries had been the mainstream. Hitachi developed a two-pump, two-valve system unique to Japan, which enabled combined actions of lifting and turning a boom, thereby drastically improving the workability.

The system was adopted subsequently by many manufacturers. In this sense, the machine is a heritage that can be situated at the origin of the development of today’s hydraulic excavators.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Tsuchiura Works, Hitachi Construction Machinery

● Hours open: 9:00–16:00
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, year-end/New Yearʼs, Bon holidays or other plantʼs holidays
● Address: 650 Kandatsu-machi, Tsuchiura-shi, Ibaraki 315-0013
● Tel: +81-29-832-7150
● URL: http://www.hitachi-kenki.co.jp/
● Access: 15 mins. on foot from Kandatsu Sta., JR Joban Line

 


No.49:Collection

Zipper chain machine (YKK-CM6)

Tadao Yoshida, the founder of YKK, uniquely developed a mechanism in 1953 that connects engaging parts (zip teeth) to a fastener manufacturing machine (chain machine) in an intermittent manner and mounted the mechanism on a chain machine. The mechanism was a revolutionary invention at the time and became the No. 1 patent of YKK.

The machine was completely self-developed, out of the CM6 models manufactured in 1981, with manufacturing starting in 1964.  Performance of highest level in the world at that time was achieved, including a mechanism to punch zip teeth out of a flat square wire by using the punch and the die and mechanism to implant them intermittently.

The fasteners manufactured through the integrated manufacturing processes from materials to products with the originality and ingenuity stated above lead to high quality and low costs and, therefore, are used in various fields, including not only garments in modern life, but also for the purpose of making tunnels water-resistant and making spacesuits airtight, thereby contributing to the improvement of people’s lives and the development of various industries.

On exhibition

YKK Center Park

● Hours open: 9:00–16:30 (Entry closes at 15:30.)
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Mondays (or next day in case of a national holiday on a Monday), New Year’s Holiday’s, Extra Holidays * May close on other days for certain reasons; please check in advance.
● Address: 200 Yoshida, Kurobe-shi, Toyama 938-8601
● Tel: +81-765-54-8181
● URL: http://www.ykkcenterpark.jp
● Access: About 20 mins. by bus from Kurobe-Unazukionsen Sta., JR Line Hokuriku Shinkansen, About 15 mins. on foot from Ikuji Sta., Aino-Kaze Toyama Railway


No.50:Collection

Ticket Vending Machine

The world’s first multi-function ticket vending machine was developed by the Vending Machine Division of Takamisawa Electric (currently Takamisawa Cybernetics) in 1962. The term ‘multi-function’ indicates that the machine has a printing mechanism, thereby enabling the vending of multiple types of ticket.

This machine, manufactured in 1969, is a model that was mass-produced based on the world’s first technology for multi-functions and is the oldest existing and operable multi-function ticket vending machine. The control unit consists of about 250 relays and the machine also features a unique mechanical coin processing machine. The machines were installed at EXPO Chuoguchi Station of Kita-Osaka Kyuko Railway Co, Ltd. at the EXPO site in 1970 and were taken over by the present-day company and preserved in working condition.

The machine prompted the dissemination of ticket vending machine to stations, etc. of various railway companies thereafter and is a heritage that shows the originality and the excellence of machine technologies.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Takamisawa Cybernetics Nagano 3rd factory (Engineering Bldg.)

● Hours open: 10:00–16:00
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, year-end/New Yearʼs, Bon holidays, etc.
● Address: 5662 Taguchi, Saku-shi, Nagano 384-0412
● Tel (exhibit facility): +81-267-82-7331
● URL: http://www.tacy.co.jp
● Access: About 5 mins. by taxi from Nakagomi Sta., JR Komi Line (Yatsugatake Kogen Line) About 15 mins. by taxi from Sakudaira Sta., Nagano Shinkansen Line (Nearest Otabe, Tatsuokajo Stations are unmanned.)


No.51:Landmark

The stainless steel railcars (Tokyu 5200 EMU & 7000 EMU)

The Tokyu 5200 EMU is a railcar that used stainless steel for the exterior in 1958 for the first time in Japan, aiming to be maintenance-free by eliminating paint work. The preserved DEHA 5201 car is the No. 1 car of this type and played an experimental role for introducing the stainless-steel car.

The Tokyu 7000 Series car is Japan’s first all-stainless-steel car that was manufactured by Tokyu Car Corporation (currently Japan Transport Engineering Company) by adding its unique technologies, while they were introducing manufacturing technologies from the United States. The model DEHA 7052 manufactured in 1965 had been used for 34 years until it was retired from active service in 1999.

These railcars constitute the original models of domestic stainless-steel railcars that were disseminated as today’s commuter cars.

In the adjacent Yokohama Plant Heritage Hall, precious documents including car body completion drawings are preserved and are used as educational materials together with the preserved railcars.

Off exhibition (in principle)

Japan Transport Engineering Company

● Address: 3-1 Okawa, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 236-0043
● Tel: +81-45-701-5155
● URL: http://www.j-trec.co.jp/
● Access: 7 mins. on foot from Kanazawa-hakkei Sta., Keikyu Line


No.52:Landmark

Yoshino-yama Ropeway

difference in height of 103 meters. This is the oldest passenger ropeway in service in Japan. Furthermore, it is one of the oldest ones in the world whose initial form at the time of construction has been preserved.

The 4-line cross-type mechanism with two towing ropes and two balance ropes (currently 3-line cross-type with one balance rope) where the passenger wagon is arranged between two stays was adopted. The early-stage structure is well preserved including the carrier (gondola) shape that fits the gradient, use of locked coil ropes with smoothed surface that became the mainstream after the World War II, and the station building and the poles that preserve the forms at the time of construction, etc. in good shape.

The ropeway is still used by many tourists as a means of transportation located at the starting point of the World Heritage ‘Sacred Places and Pilgrimage Routes in the Kii Mountain Range.’

Suspended Service

Yoshino-yama Ropeway

● Hours open: 8:20–17:40 (Entry closes at 17:40.)
● Admission fee: 350 yen one-way/600 yen round-trip for adults 180 yen one-way/300 yen round-trip for children
● Days closed: No days closed (Reservation required for groups)
● Address: 79 Yoshino-yama, Yoshino-cho, Yoshino-gun, Nara 639-3115
● Tel: +81-746-32-0200
● URL: http://www.yokb315.co.jp
● Access: 2 mins. on foot from Kintetsu Yoshino Sta.


No.53:Collection

Ikegai Standard Engine Lathe No.1

This lathe is an English-type nine-foot lathe that was manufactured by Shotaro Ikegai, the founder of Ikegai Factory (later Ikegai Iron Works; currently Ikegai Corp.), the first manufacturer of machine tools in Japan, and his younger brother Kishiro in 1889 as a facility machine for the factory of their company.

The center-to-center distance is 5 feet (actual measurement: 1,550 millimeters), the bed is of the English type and a cutout is provided. This is the oldest engine lathe manufactured in Japan.

It is said that there were two 12-foot and 6-foot lathes of the English type in the factory. This is a monumental machine tool in the history of the machinery industry in Japan, indicating the high technical level of the Ikegai brothers, who opened up the road to domestic production of the mother machine in an environment with a lack of machinery and materials.

On exhibition

National Museum of Nature and Science

● Hours open: 9:00–17:00 (Entry closes at 16: 30.) 9:00–20:00 (Entry closes at 19:30.) only on Fridays
● Admission fee: 620 yen for adults, free for senior high schoolers or younger
● Days closed: Mondays (Tuesday if falling on a holiday) year-end/New Year’s holidays (Dec. 28–Jan. 1)
● Address: 7-20 Ueno Koen, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-8718
● Tel (exhibit facilities): +81-3-5777-8600
● URL: http://www.kahaku.go.jp/
● Access: 5 mins. on foot from the park exit of Ueno Sta., JR Line


No.54:Collection

Ricopy101 (Desktop Copier)

The Ricopy 101 is Japan’s first portable diazo wet-type copying machine of the exposure-development integrated type which Riken Optical Industry Co., Ltd. (currently Ricoh Co., Ltd.) released in 1955. The use of diazo sensitized paper that was developed around the same time eliminated rinsing with water after development. This was a revolutionary office-use machine that realized water-free and odor-free exposure and development.

Original mechanisms are employed, including an exposure, burning and development device, a development roller that prevents wrinkles and curling of wet paper, and paper-feed rollers. Owing to its portable profile and easy operation, Ricopy 101 was rapidly disseminated. The number of units produced during ten years after the release exceeded 1 million, including successor machines, which played a pathfinding role in the streamlining/mechanization (office automation) of clerical work.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Ricoh Technology Center

● Hours open: 10:00–17:00 (Entry closes at 16:00.)
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, year-end/New Year’s, Bon holidays (Please check in advance.)
● Address: 810 Shimo-Imaizumi, Ebina-shi, Kanagawa 243-0460
● Tel (exhibit facilities): +81-46-236-2400
● URL: https://www.ricoh.co.jp/about/company/
directory/research_dev/tech.html

● Access: 10 mins. on foot from west exit of Ebina Sta., Sotetsu Line/Odakyu Line, 7 mins. on food from west exit of JR Line
* By Odakyu Line/Sotetsu Line, go toward JR Sagami Line.


No.55:Collection

WASHLET G (Toilet Seat with Shower Unit)

WASHLET G is the first-generation toilet seat with a warm water spray unit, which TOTO LTD. developed and started releasing in 1980. Originally, Japanese people were by no means in the habit of washing the bottom with water. However, believing in the dissemination of the toilet seat with a warm water spray unit into general households, TOTO started development in 1978, and struggled through the release after overcoming various difficulties.

The apparatus spread rapidly thanks to the effect of TV commercials, and similar products were released in the course of time. The penetration rate for households exceeds 70% at present and the products drastically changed the lifestyle of Japanese people and the lavatory equipment environment. At present, Toto’s ‘Washlet’ has become synonymous with a toilet seat and warm water spray unit.

On exhibition (Reservation required for 20 persons or more)

TOTO Museum

● Hours open: 10:00–17:00 (Entry closes at 16:30.)
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Mondays, summer vacation period, year-end/New Year’s holidays
● Address: 2-1-1 Nakashima, Kokurakita, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 802-8601
● Tel: +81-93-951-2534
● URL: https://jp.toto.com/museum/en/
● Access: About 10 mins. by taxi from Kokurajyo Exit at Kokura Sta., JR Line


No.56:Landmark

Mechanical Car Parking System ‘ROTOPARK’

The ROTOPARK is a genuine mechanical car parking system. It was installed in the parking lot at Shinjuku station’s south gate (currently Keio Underground Parking Lot) in 1976 by Japan Rotopark, and since then, the machine has been maintained and inspected by ShinMaywa Industries, Ltd.

The feature of the system is that a car can be delivered using a carriage with forks and the precise positioning of the forks is mechanically controlled using relays and DC motors.

‘ROTOPARK’ is at the very top of genuine mechanical car parking systems, and the parking lot is an example of a system still in commercial service at a time when digital control systems are becoming mainstream.

Off exhibition (in principle)

Keio Chika Chushajou

● Address: 1 Minamiguchi Chikagai, Nishi-Shinjuku 1-chome, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-0023
● Tel: +81-3-5333-8711
● URL: https://www.keiochika.co.jp/parking/
● Access: Shinjuku Sta., Keio Line


No.57:Collection

Dawn of Japanese Home Electric Appliances

The appliances shown here are at the dawn of domestic products and were manufactured by Shibaura Engineering Works (currently Toshiba) in the first year of the Showa Era. They are monuments that served as a starting point for absorbing and analyzing foreign technologies and starting domestic production. These appliances would end up bringing about drastic changes in people’s lives.

1) Electric Refrigerator Model SS-1200 (1930)
The model disseminated new food preservation methods of refrigeration and freezing.
2) Electric Washing Machine Model A (1930)
The machine was commercialized by fusing technologies of two companies in the United States. It was the only domestic model until 1952.
3) Electric Vacuum Cleaner Model VC-A (1931)

The appliance was modeled on products made in the United States. Serving as a model for products of other companies, the appliances were rapidly disseminated into general households.

On exhibition

Toshiba Science Museum

● Hours open: Tuesday–Friday 10:00–17:30 Saturday/Sunday/National Holidays 10:00–18:00
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Mondays (unless a National Holiday) and other dates specified by the Museum
● Address: 2F Lazona Kawasaki Toshiba Bldg., 72-34, Horikawa-Cho, Saiwai-Ku, Kawasaki 212-8585
● Tel: +81-44-549-2200
● URL: http://toshiba-mirai-kagakukan.jp/en/index.htm
● Access: 1 min. on foot from Kawasaki Sta., JR Line

 


No.58:Collection

Former Yokosuka Arsenal’s Steam Hammers

A steam hammer is a machine that forges metals by driving a hammer with steam power. The six steam hammers imported from the Netherlands in 1865 as a modernization policy of Japan’s feudal government were deployed in the shipbuilding yard (referred to as the ‘arsenal’ at that time) in Yokosuka and Yokohama. However, only these two steam hammers exist today. The workload capacity of the hammer head is 0.5 tons (single frame) and 3 tons (double frame).

These steam hammers had been used for a century or longer and are precious machines that show evidence of the modern history of Japan following the end of the Edo Era.

On exhibition

Verny Commemorative Museum

● Hours open: 9:00–17:00
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Mondays (the following day if falling on a holiday), year-end/New Year’s holidays
● Address: 1-1 Higashi-Hemi-cho, Yokosuka-shi, Kanagawa 238-0045
● Tel: +81-46-824-1800
● URL: http://www.museum.yokosuka.kanagawa.jp/
verny/frame_verny.html

● Access: 2 mins. on foot from Yokosuka Sta., JR Line


No.59:Collection

Okuma Non-round Plain Bearing and GPB Cylindrical Grinder

The Okuma non-round plain bearing is a dynamic pressure bearing developed by Shinkichi Nagaoka in 1954. The wedge-shaped oil film is formed as the main shaft rotates at three points on the periphery of the bearing, thereby achieving high rotation precision and rigidity.

The GPB cylindrical grinder is a revolutionary grinding machine. The non-round plain bearing is mounted and the rough cutting, finishing and sizing processes are performed in a consecutive cycle, thereby achieving a mirror finish.

The technology, since succeeded by the present-day CNC cylindrical grinder, constitutes the best-known revolutionary technique of machine tools and served as the foundation for growth of the precision machinery industry in Japan after World War II.

Off exhibition (in principle)

Okuma Memorial Gallery

● Address: 5-25-1 Shiomo-Oguchi, Oguchi-cho, Niwa-gun, Aichi 480-0193
● Tel: +81-587-95-7823
● URL: http://www.okuma.co.jp/
● Access: 7 mins. by taxi from Kashiwamori Sta., Meitetsu Inuyama Line


No.60:Collection

Japan’s First 16mm Film Projector

Japan’s first 16mm film projector is the Elmo 16mm Projector ‘Model A’ released in 1927. It was said about the person who developed the projector, Hidenobu Sakaki, the founder of Elmo, ‘There is a genius of invention in Nagoya’. He engaged in thorough studies of an imported 16mm projector and completed the first hand-driven Model A. The small projector devised by Sakaki contributed greatly to the film culture and audio-visual education in Japan. Elmo Model A, Japan’s first projector, is a symbolic material in terms of the history of image culture.

Off exhibition (in principle)

Elmo History Museum

● Address: 6-14 Meizen-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi 467-8567
● Tel: +81-52-811-5133
● URL: http://www.elmo.co.jp
● Access: About 10 mins. on foot from Meitetsu Horita Sta., About 5 mins. on foot subway Horita Sta.


No.61:Collection

Japanese Automata ‘YUMIHIKI-DOJI’

The ‘Yumihiki-Doji’ (a boy bending a bow) created by Hisashige Tanaka is a masterpiece of automata from the Edo Era. It was devised with his original technology, in which Japanese culture is reflected by reference to clock technologies. Simple mechanical elements are organically combined to achieve the mechanism, offering the smooth action of shooting an arrow and humanlike expression. The automaton shows the high level of Japanese mechanical technology in the later phase of the Edo Era, and the artisan skills and the spirit thereof is the foundation of the modernization of Japan. The automaton certified as heritage is the one preserved in Kurume City, Fukuoka Prefecture, the birthplace of Hisashige.

Off exhibition

Cultural Asset Museum

● Address: 1830-6 Suwano-machi, Kurume-shi, Fukuoka, 830-0037
● Tel: +81-942-38-6194
● Access: About 10 mins. on foot from Nishitetsu Kurume Sta.

 


No.62:Landmark

Soil and Tractor Museum of Hokkaido

This museum was established under the theme of the history of agricultural machines and the management of soil operated on by the machinery. The aim is to present a philosophy of agricultural management to be passed on to the next generation through the actual educational materials (agricultural machines).

The group of agricultural machines comprising 80 tractors and other machinery includes especially those that were used mainly on farms in Hokkaido and manufactured during the period when up-sizing and mechanization rapidly progressed after World War II. Such machines serve as testaments to the transitional history of large-scale agricultural management in Hokkaido, which is fundamentally different from that in other areas in Japan.

The museum also houses many documents related to the farming machines.

On exhibition (Reservation required for groups)

Tsuchi-no-yakata

● Hours open: 9:00–16:00
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, holidays of Furano branch, Sugano Farm Machinery Mfg. (No days closed in Jul.–Aug.)
● Address: Nishi 2-sen Kita-25 go, Kamifurano-cho, Sorachi-gun, Hokkaido 071-0502
● Tel: +81-167-45-3055
● URL: http://www.sugano-net.co.jp/yakata.html
● Access: 35 mins. by car from Asahikawa Airport, 5 mins. by car from Kami-Furano Sta., JR Line


No.63:Landmark

Museum of Agricultural Technology Progress

The Museum of the NARO Bio-oriented Technology Research Advancement Institution (Institution of Agricultural Machinery) preserves and exhibits more than 250 domestic and foreign agricultural instruments used during the early stages from the later phase of the Meiji Era to the 1950s when the Agricultural Experiment Station of the then Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, which took on the mechanization of agriculture in Japan as a national project, executed investigations and studies to develop and improve agricultural machines. In this museum, you can get a full view of the history of mechanization of agriculture in Japan, which changed from human and animal labor to engines. And you can understand the way people were freed from painstaking agricultural work and the improvement processes in production efficiency that suits the small-scale agriculture in Japan.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

National Agriculture and Food Research Organization (NARO)
Bio-oriented Technology Research Advancement Institution (BRAIN)

● Hours open: 9:30–16:30
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, year-end/New Year’s, Bon holidays
● Address: 1-40-2 Nisshin-cho, Kita-ku, Saitama-shi, Saitama 331-8537
● Tel: +81-48-654-7034
● URL: http://www.naro.affrc.go.jp/index.html
● Access: 10 mins. by bus from JR Omiya Sta. to Jieitai-mae stop and 5 mins. on foot


No.64:Landmark

Telpher of the Port of Shimizu

The Telpher of the Port of Shimizu was completed in 1928. It is the only existing Telpher-type cargo-handling machinery for lifting lumber, and comprises a rail suspension steel truss structure and the surrounding premises. The Telpher of the Port of Shimizu drastically improved efficiency in discharging lumber and made a great contribution to developing the Port of Shimizu as the largest lumber discharging port in Japan. At present, a shopping mall is constructed in the neighboring area and the Telpher became a part of the landscape, including the port. It is an absolute treasure as a large-scale machine and is popular among residents.

On exhibition 

Shimizu Marine Park

● Hours open: As needed
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: No days closed
● Address: 7-7 Shinminato-cho, Shimizu-ku, Shizuoka-shi, Shizuoka 424-0824 (in Shimizu Marine Park)
● Tel: +81-54-353-2203 (Shimizu Port Authority, Shizuoka)
● URL: http://www.portofshimizu.com/
● Access: From JR Shimizu Sta./ Shizuoka Railway Shin-Shimizu Sta., take Miho Yamanote Line bus to Hatoba/Verkehr Hakubutsukan stop; 3 mins. on foot


No.65:Collection

Japan-made Snow Vehicles (KD604 & KD605) which Reached the South Pole in 1968

The snow vehicles KD604 and KD605 (both manufactured by Komatsu Ltd.) are two of three vehicles that reached the South Pole on Dec. 19, 1968, in the first and last round trip to and from the South Pole in the history of Antarctic Programs of Japan. The trip distance was about 5,200 km and it took about five months. These snow vehicles played a leading part in the Antarctic inland studies for about 10 years and contributed to the discovery of meteorites in the Antarctic for the first time in the world. The actual performance regarding the vehicle design and operation demonstrated by these snow vehicles under extreme conditions indirectly supported the expedition’s historic achievement of Japan eventually becoming the country that holds the largest number of Antarctic meteorites.

On exhibition (Reservation required for groups)

National Institute of Polar Research Polar Science Museum (KD604)

● Hours open: 10:00–17:00 (Entry closes at 16:30.)
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Sundays, Mondays, public holidays, year-end/New Year’s holidays
● Address: 10-3 Midori-cho, Tachikawa-shi, Tokyo 190-8518
● Tel: +81-42-512-0910
● URL: http://www.nipr.ac.jp/science-museum/
● Access: 25 mins., on foot from Tachikawa Sta. (north exit), JR Line 10 mins. on foot from Takamatsu Sta., Tama Monorail

 

On exhibition

The Shirase Antarctic Expedition Memorial Museum (KD605)

● Hours open: 9:00–17:00 (Entry closes at 16:30.)
● Admission fee: 300 yen for adults, 200 yen for children
● Days closed: Mondays (the following day if falling on a holiday), yearend/ New Year’s holidays * Opens on Mondays during summer vacation for elementary and junior high schools. Please inquire about vacation period.
● Address: 15-3 Aza Iwagata, Kurokawa, Nikaho-shi, Akita 018-0302
● Tel: +81-184-38-3765
● URL: http://hyper.city.nikaho.akita.jp/shirase/
● Access: 20 mins. on foot from Konoura Sta., JR Line


No.66:Collection

Japan-made Wristwatches which Showed Remarkable Technological Innovations

Manufacturing of wrist watches in Japan was started by Seikosha established by Kintaro Hattori in 1892.

The ‘Laurel Type 12’ is Japan’s first wrist watch and it was released in 1913. The debut of a wrist watch for personal use contributed to the creation of a new lifestyle for Japanese people.

The ‘First-generation Grand Seiko’ is a wrist watch that was released in 1960 and it achieved a high precision equivalent to the Switzerland Chronometer Standards, which were assumed to be the world’s highest standards at that time.

The ‘Quartz Astron 35SQ’ is the world’s first quartz-type wrist watch, released in 1969. The precision was drastically enhanced compared with conventional mechanical wrist watches.

These wrist watches are the symbolic heritage for understanding the development process of precision instrument technologies that are the pride of Japan for the world.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

The Seiko Museum

● Hours open: 10:00–16:00 (Entry closes at 15:00.)
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Mondays, public holidays (Opens on May 3, 4, 5), year-end/New Year holidays
● Address: 3-9-7 Higashi-Mukojima, Sumida-ku, Tokyo 131-0032
● Tel: +81-3-3610-6248
● URL: http://museum.seiko.co.jp
● Access: 8 mins. on foot from Tobu Higashi-Mukojima Sta.


No.67:Collection

Double Housing Plaining Machine
―Made by Akabane Engineering Works, Ministry of Industry―

This machine is a six-foot double housing plaining machine (total length 2,815 mm; total width 1230 mm; total height 1,680 mm) that was manufactured by Akabane Engineering Works, the Ministry of Industry in 1879. The Iwate prefectural government placed an order for the one listed in the catalog ‘List of Machines Manufactured’ issued by the Engineering Works and the machine was taken over at a later date as a machine for demonstration by the Iwate Prefectural Industrial School (currently Iwate Prefectural Morioka Technical High School). At present, the machine is exhibited in the Museum Meiji-mura. This machine tool presents the actual state of domestic technologies during the early stages of the mechanical industries in Japan to date and it served as a foundation for the subsequent development of the machine tool industries in Japan

On exhibition

The Museum Meiji-mura

● Hours open: (Mar.–Oct.) 9:30–17:00, (Nov.) 9:30–16:00, (Dec.–Feb.) 10:00–16:00
● Admission fee: 1,700 yen for adults, 1,300 yen for those aged 65 or older, 1,000 yen for high schoolers, 600 yen for elementary/junior high schoolers
● Days closed: Mondays in Dec.–Feb. (Open on holidays, Jan. 1–6), Dec. 31(See Website)
● Address: 1 Uchiyama, Inuyama-shi, Aichi 484-0000
● Tel: +81-568-67-0314
● URL: http://www.meijimura.com
● Access: 20 mins. by bus for Meijimura from Inuyama Sta., Meitetsu Inuyama Line


No.68:Collection

Fuji Automatic Massage Machine

The machine was manufactured in 1954 by Nobuo Fujimoto, who established Fuji Seisakusho (presently Fuji Medical Instruments Mfg. Co., Ltd.) and is the first massproduction type massaging machine in the world. Through trial and error, by modifying parts of conventional machines, including the use of softballs as massaging balls, they finally completed the chair. Massaging chairs were installed in public bathhouses, department stores, etc. in the early years. As a result of their expanded use since then, they became installed even in households as what is referred to as ‘health-oriented household appliances.’ This machine is symbolic of the origin of the massaging chair.

Off exhibition (in principle)

Fuji Medical Instruments Mfg. Co., Ltd.

● Address: 2372-95 Taishi, Taishi-cho, Minami-Kawachi-gun, Osaka 583-0995
● Tel: +81-721-98-6870
● URL: http://www.fujiiryoki.co.jp/
● Access: 10 mins. by taxi from Kaminotaishi Sta., Kinki Nippon Railway, Minami-Osaka Line.


No.69:Documents

‘The Collection of Drawings for Japanese Machines’

The academic text ‘The Collection of Drawings for Japanese Machines’ issued by the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers was published with a view toward ‘disseminating correct knowledge of domestic products to general engineers and serving as reference drawings in terms of teaching mechanical engineering’. The book has undergone several updates since 1932 to become a precious educational material for students interested in mechanical engineering. On the other hand, for general engineers, the book was meaningfully used across the machinery industry, as it spurred awareness of commonly using domestic machines and promoted their utilization, thereby contributing greatly to the advancement and the development of industries and educational circles in Japan.

On exhibition

The Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers bureau/exhibit room

● Hours open: 9:00–16:30
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, year-end/New Year’s holidays
● Address: 5F Shinanomachi Rengakan, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-0016
● Tel: +81-3-5360-3500
● URL: http://www.jsme.or.jp/
● Access: 1 min. on foot from Shinanomachi Sta., JR Line


No.70:Landmark

Railway Bascule Bridge ‘Suehiro Kyoryo’

The ‘Suehiro Kyoryo’ that spans the Chitose Canal in Yokkaichi City, Mie Prefecture, is a cantilever beam-type railway bascule bridge with a length of 58 m. It was completed in December 1931 and is the only railway movable bridge still in service. Thanks to the use of a dogleg link balancing device, the power required is kept constant irrespective of the angle of the moving bridge beam, and further it is devised to reduce the required power compared with previous moving bridges. Utaro Yamamoto (Yamamoto Engineering Works Co., Ltd.) designed and manufactured the bridge. The bridge has been used mainly for carrying cement out to the present day, and large amounts of earth and sand were transported by vehicles across the bridge during the construction of Chubu International Airport.

Outside: On exhibition Inside: Off exhibition

Japan Freight Railway Within Yokkaichi Sta. Yokkaichi Harbor Line

● Address: Yokkaichi-shi, Mie
● Tel: +81-3-5367-7370
● URL: http://www.jrfreight.co.jp/
● Access: 20 mins. on foot from Yokkaichi Sta., JR Line


No.71:Collection

Automatic Encrusting Machine Model 105

The encrusting work of Japanese confectionery done manually by craftsmen was mechanized by Torahiko Hayashi, the founder of Rheon Automatic Machinery Co., Ltd., in 1963 for the first time in the world. It was accomplished based on his unique shape-forming theory, to which rheology is applied, and he put the machine to practical use as an automatic encrusting machine. Model 105, which was released in February 1966, is a popular machine which was completed after making many improvements, including enhancement of operability and durability. It made significant contributions to the subsequent modernization of the confectionary industry and was disseminated to overseas markets.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Rheology Memorial Museum

● Hours open: 8:30–17:30 (Entry closes at 16:30.)
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, year-end/New Year’s, Bon holidays (Check in advance.)
● Address: 2-3 Nozawa-machi, Utsunomiya-shi, Tochigi 320-0071
● Tel: +81-28-665-7091
● URL: http://www.rheon.com/jp/index.php
● Access: 40 mins. by bus from Utsunomiya Sta., JR Line


No.72:Collection

Automatic Transmission of ‘MIKASA’

This device is an automatic transmission that was on board the ‘MIKASA’ released in 1957 as a four-wheel automobile and it featured an original torque converter produced for the first time in Japan. The device comprises the torque converter and the transmission that Okamura Corporation succeeded in developing in 1951, and it constitutes a power unit, as it is integrated with a 2-cylinder horizontally opposed engine. At present, the automatic transmission is preserved and exhibited at Okamura Chair Museum.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Okamura Chair Museum

● Hours open: 9:00–17:00 (* Reservation required by morning of preceding day.)
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, holidays
● Address: 2-13-2 Nagata-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0014
● Tel: +81-3-3593-6195
● URL: http://www.okamura.co.jp/company/museum/
● Access: 5 mins. on foot from Akasaka-mitsuke Sta., Tokyo Metro Ginza/Marunouchi Line


No.73:Collection

Japan-made First Coin Counter

This coin counter is Japan’s first of its kind. It was developed at the request of the Mint in 1949 by Kokuei Machinery Manufacturing (currently GLORY LTD.), founded in 1918, and delivered to the Mint in February 1950. The counter was designed to be more compact than past foreign-made counters and the counting accuracy was significantly improved. Further improvements were made to the first model at the request of a private bank and commercial model No. 1 was completed in October 1953. In December of the same year, the company delivered 20 units to the bank. The coin counter made significant contributions not only to banking services, but also to labor saving and higher reliability of money handling activities.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Glory Next Gallery

● Hours open: 8:30–17:15 (* by advance reservation only; for corporations, public institutions only)
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, year-end/New Year’s holidays. etc.
● Address: 1-3-1 Shimoteno, Himeji-shi, Hyogo 670-8567
● Tel: +81-79-297-3131
● URL: http://www.corporate.glory-global.com/
● Access: [Train] about 10 mins. on foot from Harima-Takaoka Sta., JR Kishin Line [Bus] about 15 mins. from front of Himeji Sta. by Shinki Bus


No.74:Collection

KOBAS Stationary Suction Gas Engine and Charcoal Gas Producer Unit

During the petroleum shortage during and after World War II, the wood gas engine supported a great part of motive power. Although the engine is not part of the history of power engines, it can be said to be the first power source to use ‘biomass’, which attracts considerable attention as a renewable energy these days. The Kobayashi-style wood gas engine was manufactured by Shutaro Kobayashi of Kobayashi Brothers Iron Works (Hiroshima Prefecture) in 1936 and his unique devices and their features are notable, including block transportability and a diversion mechanism to a petroleumdriven engine. In addition, many documents used at that time have been preserved, in which the history of comprehensive production by manufacturers of small- to mid-size engines can be known.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

The Miike Iron Works Co Ltd.

● Hours open: 10:00–16:00 (* Reservation required)
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, year-end/New Year’s, Bon holidays
● Address: 396-2 Kannabe-cho Kawaminami, Fukuyama-shi, Hiroshima 720-2124
● Tel: +81-84-963-5500
● URL: http://www.miike.co.jp
● Access: 15 mins. on foot/ 5 mins. by taxi from Kannabe Sta., JR Line


No.75:Collection

Small Once-through Steam Boiler Type ZP

The small once-through boiler Type ZP manufactured by ‘Miura Seisakusho’ Co., Ltd. (currently MIURA CO., LTD.) was completed in 1959. The boiler can be easily handled even if no boiler engineer is assigned. In addition, the use was expanded to many shops and small and medium enterprises that could not use boiler-generated steam for the following reasons: the footprint is smaller than conventional boilers; the vessel structure of the unique Z-shaped water tube contributes to significantly small heat dissipation from the boiler both in operation and not in operating at night, thereby securing energy-saving effects; and operations are smooth, while costs are low, because water feeding and combustion are performed under automatic control.

Off exhibition (in principle)

MIURA CO., LTD. (* Off exhibition in principle; see URL below for details.)

● Address: 7 Horie-cho, Matsuyama-shi, Ehime 799-2696
● Tel: +81-89-979-7019
● URL: http://www.miuraz.co.jp/


No.76:Collection

All Electric Industrial Robot ‘MOTOMAN-L10’

The ‘MOTOMAN-L10’ is a fully electric industrial robot that was developed and released by Yaskawa Electric Corporation in 1977 for the first time in Japan. The company, which is the origin of the term ‘Mechatronics’, developed the robot with its motor technologies and related applications. As the robot had superior controllability regarding positioning and speed compared with conventional hydraulic robots and maintenance and inspection work was easier, the robot participated actively in arc welding, sealing work, etc. This machine served as a foundation for industrial robots presently supporting a variety of manufacturing process in Japan, including in the automotive industry.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Yaskawa History Museum

● Hours open: 9:30–16:40
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, company holidays, days for company circumstances
● Address: 2-1 Kurosaki Shiroishi, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu-shi, Fukuoka 806-0004
● Tel: +81-93-645-7705
● URL: https://www.yaskawa-global.com/
● Access: 3 mins. on foot from north exit of Kurosaki Sta., JR Kagoshima Line


No.77:Landmark

Matsukawa Geothermal Power Plant

This power plant started operating in 1966. It was the first geothermal power plant for commercial use in Japan. The output at the start of operations was 9,500 kW. The output was gradually increased and reached 23,500 kW in 1993. The facility is still in active service after 50 years, and the major structures and equipment that had been designed and manufactured at the time of the inauguration are still in use. The Matsukawa Geothermal Power Plant comprises a group of equipment that show together that the plant was a leader in technology development, as a forerunner of the use of renewable energy in Japan and that in its resolution of various problems unique to geothermal energy.

On exhibition

Matsukawa Geothermal Power Plant
Matsukawa Geothermal Museum

● Hours open: 9:00–16:00
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Tuesdays, winter season (mid-Nov. to end of Apr.)
● Address: Matsuo Yoriki, Hachimantai-shi, Iwate 028-7302
● Inquiry: Tohoku Sustainable & Renewable Energy Co. Inc.
● Tel: +81-22-722-6510
● Access: About 1 hr. 50 mins. by bus from Morioka Sta., JR Line 25 mins. by car from Matsuo-Hachimantai IC, Tohoku Expressway


No.78:Collection

SUBARU 360-K111

This car was released in 1958 and became the first highly popular model among mini-size vehicles, which have unique automobile standards in Japan. It is one of 60 SUBARU 360 cars that were first manufactured. Various devices incorporating aeronautical technologies ensure rigidity for its light weight, enabling the accommodation of four adult passengers and the maximum speed of 83km/h. The cumulative number of cars produced until production finished in 1970 exceeded 390,000 units. The car became so known to people that it received the nickname ‘Tentoumushi’ (ladybug) for its completely novel design.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Fuji Heavy Industries Gunma Plant Subaru Visitor Center

● Hours open: 8:30–17:00
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: See website.
● Address: 1-1 Shoya-machi, Ota-shi, Gunma 373-0822
● Tel: +81-276-48-3101
● URL: https://www.subaru.co.jp/csr/factory-tour/
● Access: About 20 mins. by taxi from Ota Sta., Tobu Isesaki Line


No.79:Collection

Double Expansion Marine Steam Engine

This engine is a double expansion marine steam engine with an output of 97 horsepower. It had been used on board the small wooden steam ship ‘Tachibana-Maru’ (22 tons) built in 1911 as its main engine.

The multiple expansions reciprocating steam engine was developed in the latter half of the 19th century to deal with the trend of a larger output of ships and it played an active part until the middle of the 20th century when steam turbine engines stole the spotlight.

The engine shown here is preserved as a steam engine that can still be operated. It also has significant social meaning in society, as it has been used for governmental duties and education of ship engineers.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

Sakai Engine Storage

● Open days: 10:00–16:00 on Second Sunday of Every Month
● Admission fee: Free
● Address: 588 Kamikarako, Higashi-Matsuyama-shi, Saitama 355-0077
● Inquiry: NPO Japan Engine Heritage Conservation Association office
● Tel: +81-88-844-5157
● Access: 15 mins. by taxi from Higashi-Matsuyama Sta., Tobu Railway Tojo Line


 

No.80:Collection

Simple Cash Register ‘Zeni-ai-ki’

This machine is a simple cash register that was manufactured around 1916. Itoki Shoten (currently Itoki Corporation) in Osaka manufactured and sold the machine. This is one of the products that saw major success under the brand name ‘Zeni-ai-ki’ (money matching machine) at a later date. Various unique devices realized minimum necessary functions, including management of sale proceeds and crime prevention. Also, the price was set at a level far lower than imported products, and the total number of units sold exceeded 10,000 in 1927.

After World War II, the cash register became widely used throughout the nation until the full-fledged register made its debut. The commodity name significantly contributed to dissemination of the machine.

On exhibition (Reservation required)

ITOKI Tokyo Innovation Center SYNQA

● Hours open: 9:00–17:00
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays, summer holidays, year-end/New Year’s holidays, company event dates
● Address: 3-7-1 Kyobashi, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0031 1-3F Sogokan 110 Tower
● Tel: +81-3-6228-6940
● URL: http://www.synqa.jp/
● Access: 10 mins. on foot from Yaesu south exit of Tokyo Sta. JR Line direct from Kyobashi Sta., Ginza Line of Tokyo Metro 3 mins. on foot from Takara-cho Sta., Asakusa Line of Toei Subway


No.81:Collection

Tatsuno’s Patent Gasoline Measuring Equipment Type No.25

Uchu Tatsuno, the founder of Tatsuno Seisakusho (currently TATSUNO Corporation), acquired patents for gasoline measuring equipment and a safety device for underground gasoline storage for the first time in Japan, and thereby created the country’s prototype gas station.

The machine shown here made its debut as the last purely mechanical measuring equipment and was manufactured in 1937. It pumps up gasoline stored in an underground tank with a manual pump to a glass container above. By reading the level difference between the sliding pipe and the reference pipe in the glass container, a supply of gasoline in units of five liters or 1 gallon was made possible. The machine served as the foundation of commercial gasoline measuring equipment.

Off exhibition (in principle, see URL below for details)

TATSUNO Showroom in the Yokohama Plant

● Address: 4-1-1 Kasama, Sakae-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa 247-8570
● Inquiry: Same as above
● Tel: +81-50-9000-0845
● URL: http://www.tatsuno.co.jp/english/
● Access: 15 mins. from Ofuna Sta., JR Line


No.82:Collection

Gate-type Car Wash Machine

This machine is Japan’s first gate-type car wash featuring moving brushes and was developed by Takeuchi Iron Works Co., Ltd. (currently Takeuchi Techno Co., Ltd.) in 1962. It served as the basis for automatic car wash machines currently disseminated throughout the world. Car washing is possible in one round-trip operation with the car stopped, the required footprint only is only a space of 1.5 cars, and the required time is three minutes.

The machine shown here is the first mass-production machine manufactured in 1963 and the cumulative number of units of the Series sold to date is 120,000 for domestic and foreign markets.

Off exhibition (in principle)

Takeuchi Techno Co., Ltd. * Off exhibition in principle; see URL below for details.

● Address: 2 Kiba-cho, Minato-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi 455-0021
● Inquiry: Same as above
● Tel: +81-52-691-5151
● URL: http://www.takeuchi-techno.co.jp/


No.83:Collection

Optical Instruments of the Kashinosaki Lighthouse

The Kashinosaki Lighthouse is a rotating flash lamp lighthouse that was first illuminated in 1870 and is one of the first eight western-style lighthouses constructed in Japan.

In 1933, the lighthouse was changed to the domestic mercury bath-type rotating mechanical equipment and has been used for the longest period of time. The initial weight-type driving unit is not used anymore, but it is preserved in the lighthouse.

The lighthouse is an actively working beacon based on which the entire picture of mercury bath-type rotating mechanical equipment disseminated throughout the nation after the latter half of the Meiji Era can be grasped.

Outside: On exhibition Inside: Off exhibition

Kashinosaki Lighthouse

● Admission fee: Free
● Address: Kashinozaki, Kushimoto-cho, Higashi-Muro-gun, Wakayama 649-3631
● Inquiry: 5th Regional Coast Guard Headquarters
● Tel: +81-78-391-0064


No.84:Site

Mechanical equipment full set in the bascule bridge at Kachidoki-bashi

This movable bridge over the Sumida River connecting Tsukiji and Tsukishima opened in June 1940 and the distance between movable supports (51.6 m) is one of the longest in Japan. The weight of the movable girder is approximately 1,000 tons for each side. The counterweight (approx. 1,000 tons) is installed inside the bridge abutment, and the bridge is driven by a motor combined with tooth gears arranged at the center of gravity of the bridge abutment. With regard to the conversion to land carriage from transportation by ship, swinging operations ceased on November 29, 1970. The bridge is famous in terms of the tradition of efforts by Japanese engineers, the beauty of its configuration, its appearance in literary works, etc.

On exhibition

Kachidoki Bridge Museum

● Hours open: 9:30–16:30 (9:00–16:00 during 12/1–2/28)
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: Mondays, Wednesdays, Sundays, 12/29–1/3
● Address: 6-20-11 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045
● Tel: +81-3-3543-5672
● URL: http://www.kensetsu.metro.tokyo.jp/jigyo/
road/kanri/gaiyo/kachidoki/

● Access: 8 mins. on foot from Kachidoki Sta., Toei Oedo Line, or 9 mins. on foot from Tsukiji-shijo Sta., Toei Oedo Line


No.85:Site

The longitudinal flow ventilation system by Jet fan (booster fan) of Okuda Tunnel

In Okuda Tunnel on the Kitakyushu Urban Expressway, the jet fan made by Voith, West Germany (internal diameter: 630 mm; total length: 4.7 m), was first adopted in Japan as the longitudinal mechanical ventilation system. This jet fan was in service from 1966 to 1975. The tunnel air ventilation system that is best suited for the road conditions unique to Japan, where there are many mountainous areas and dense populations, is currently adopted for most (more than 80%) road tunnels in the country.

Off exhibition (in principle)

Ibaraki Technical Training Center, West Nippon Expressway Co., Ltd.

● Address: 4-10-1 Kami-Hozumi, Ibaraki-shi, Osaka 567-0036
● Tel: +81-6-6344-9251
● Inquiry: Same as above


No.86:Collection

Electric car of Japan’s first subway

This is the first operated car for Japan’s first full-fledged subway, which opened between Ueno and Asakusa in Tokyo in December 1927. Imported core components and domestic components were combined, but Japan’s first impactor type ATS (Automatic Train Stop) was featured, placing significance on safety. When the car was restored, points of refurbishment were recorded in detail, thereby ensuring high documentary value, and the car shows the foundation of technological development of
subways in Japan, including the safety concept. The car was designated as the ‘Important Cultural Property’ in 2017.

On exhibition

Tokyo Metro Museum

● Hours open: 10:00–17:00 (Entry closes at 16:30.)
● Admission fee: 210 yen for adults, 100 yen for children aged 4 to junior high schoolers; group discount offered (reservation required for groups)
● Days closed: Mondays (the following day if falling on a holiday), year-end/New Year’s holidays (12/30–1/3)
● Address: 6-3-1 Higashi-Kasai, Edogawa-ku, Tokyo 134-0084
● Tel: +81-3-3878-5011
● URL: http://www.chikahaku.jp/
● Access: Under elevated tracks at Kasai Sta., Tokyo Metro Tozai Line.


No.87:Collection

Deep Submergence Research Vehicle SHINKAI 2000

The deep submergence research vehicle SHINKAI 2000 was completed in 1981 as the successor vehicle of Japan’s first manned research submersible SHINKAI (1970–1976) and it had been in service for a long period of time exceeding 20 years until its final submergence. The inside diameter of the pressure hull is 2.2 m, and the vehicle can carry three crew members. SHINKAI 2000 played a significant role in the development of deep-sea research and in marine resources surveys, including the discovery of chemosynthetic vesicomyid clams (Phreagena soyoae) in Sagami Bay and the discovery of the hydrothermal venting henomenon in the Okinawa Trough. At present, the vehicle is on permanent display at the Enoshima Aquarium.

On exhibition

Enoshima Aquarium

● Hours open: 9:00–17:00
* Varies depending on season (Entry closes one hour before closing time).
● Admission fee: 2,400 yen for adults, 1,500 yen for high schoolers, 1,000 yen for elementary/ junior high schoolers, 600 yen for children aged 3 or older
● Days closed: No days closed except for temporary closing for facility check.
● Address: 2-19-1 Katase-Kaigan, Fujisawa-shi, Kanagawa 251-0035
● Tel: +81-466-29-9960
● URL: http://www.enosui.com/
● Access: 3 mins. on foot from Katase-Enoshima Sta., Odakyu Enoshima Line
10 mins. on foot from Enoshima Sta., Enoden Line
10 mins. on foot from Shonan-Enoshima Sta., Shonan Monorail Line


No.88:Collection

Green Sand Molding Machine Type C-11

This is Japan’s first green sand molding machine. It was manufactured in 1927 by ‘Chotaro Kubota’ of Kubota Chuzousho (currently Sintokogio Co., Ltd.) in Nagoya. Kubota developed the machine in his own right by using a machine made in the United States as the model. The mechanization of foundries in Japan started with this machine. It is a general-purpose green sand molding machine for small pieces and is capable of performing a series of processes, including manufacturing of lower and upper molds and stripping work. The appearance of the machine contributed to the development of the machinery industry, including textile machinery and automobiles, which require a large quantity of molded parts, and technology education in Japan.

Off exhibition (in principle)

Toyokawa Works Showroom Sintokogio, Co. Ltd.

● Address: 3-1 Honohara, Toyokawa-shi, Aichi 442-8505
● Tel: +81-533-85-3298
● URL: http://www.sinto.co.jp/


No.89:Collection

Multihead Weigher ACW-M-1

This machine, manufactured by Ishida Scales Mfg. Co., Ltd. (currently Ishida Co., Ltd.) in 1973, combines green peppers of different sizes and sorts them into groups of a certain weight. Green peppers that are continuously loaded are first delivered via the rotating disk, vibrator and linkage mechanism, and then weighed one by one. The central processing unit selects a combination of pieces whose weight is closest to the designated combined weight. The machine was capable of sorting 30 combinations per minute with an accuracy of 150±2 g without damaging them. The technology is used not only in the food industry, but also widely in various industries.

Off exhibition

Shiga Office Techno Bldg., Ishida Co., Ltd.

● Address: 959-1 Shimomagari, Ritto-shi, Shiga 520-3026


No.90:Collection

Full Automatic Glove Knitting Machine (Square Fingertip Type)

This machine was developed by Shima Seiki Mfg, Ltd. in 1964 as a fully automatic glove knitting machine for cotton work gloves. The processes of casting on the fingertips, the connection of fingers, and the knitting of palm and wrist parts were integrated in the machine. The appearance of the machine enabled the completion of gloves with minimum hand work, thereby significantly improving the productivity of glove manufacturing. The machine constituted the most basic of the garment flatknitting machines which make up today’s seamless knit wear. The machine is capable of producing a glove in 2 minutes 15 seconds and an operator can handle up to 30 machines.

On exhibition

Fusion Museum

● Hours open: 10:00–19:00 (Entry closes at 18:30)
● Admission fee: Free
● Days closed: 1/1–1/3
● Address: 3rd Floor Forte Wajima, 2-1 Hon-machi, Wakayama-shi, Wakayama 640-8033
● Tel: +81-73-488-1962
● URL: http://www.shimaseiki.co.jp/
● Access: Take Wakayama bus from Wakayama Sta., JR line to Honmachi 2-chome stop.


No.91:Collection

Historical Machine Tools collected by Nippon Institute of Technology

Nippon Institute of Technology’s Museum of Industrial Technology, established in 1987, in Saitama Prefecture, north of Tokyo, has one of the largest machine tool collections in Japan. Exhibits currently counted 232 are arranged by type and chronological order, with attention to operational conditions. Visitors can learn the transition of factory systems taken from five small factories in history. Even for those who are unfamiliar with machine tools, the Museum offers an excellent opportunity to experience the factory system development.

On exhibition

Nippon Institute of Technology’s Museum of Industrial Technology

●Hours open: 9:30–16:30 (Entry closes at 16:00)
●Admission fee: Free
●Days closed: Sundays, public holidays, summer holidays, year-end and New Year holidays
●Address: 4-1 Gakuendai, Miyashiro-machi, Minamisaitama-gun, Saitama 345-8501
●Tel: +81-480-33-7545
●URL: http://www.nit.ac.jp/center/scholarship/museum.html
●Access: 15 mins. on foot from Tobu-dobutsu-koen Sta. (west exit), TOBU SKYTREE Line


No.92:Collection

Airless Spray Painting Equipment

In late 1940s the airless spray painting equipment by direct pressure was developed in the US, and that realized improvement of coating quality and the work environment. Up to today this type of equipment has been widely used in automobile, shipbuilding, construction, architecture, and pavement. This exhibit is the first produced spray gun in Japan, in 1959, by the Asahi Okuma Industry (now Asahi Sunac Corporation) This is one of the oldest sets in existence followed by the pump of the improved pump, by the Compact Airless in 1962.

Off exhibition

Coating Technology Center, Asahi Sunac Corporation

●Address: 5050 Asahimae-cho, Owariasahi-shi, Aichi 488-8688
●Tel: +81-561-53-1213
●URL: https://www.sunac.co.jp/en/
●Access: 3 mins. on foot from Asahimae Sta., Meitetsu Seto Line


No.93:Collection

CRT Funnel Pressing Machine

Japanese television broadcasting began in 1953, in Tokyo by U.S. cathode ray tube (CRT) technology, however, in 1968 the funnel pressing machine was developed by the Nippon Electric Glass Co., Ltd., which revolutionized its manufacturing capacities. Quality and productivity were improved, and Japan-made large-sized TV sets of 24 inches or more dominated the global market by the end of the 1980s. Moulds and pedestals of the set of 1977 have been preserved.

Off exhibition

Shiga-Takatsuki Plant, Nippon Electric Glass Co., Ltd.

●Address: 1979 Takastsuki, Takatsuki-cho, Nagahama-shi, Shiga 529-0292
●Tel: +81-749-85-2233
●URL: https://www.neg.co.jp/en/
●Access: 15 mins. on foot from Takatsuki Sta., JR Hokuriku-Honsen


No.94:Collection

Type Casting Machine of Newspaper Museum

At Kumamoto Daily Newspaper’s Newspaper Museum, in Kumamoto Prefecture, Kyushu Island, visitors can learn a variety of processes, including manuscript typesetting, printing and distributing newspapers, and the change of such technologies. One of the features is the first domestically produced typecasting machine, by Eizo Hayashi (1883-1962), then president of Rinyeisha Co., as early as in 1934. It was used to print the specified number of letters required and was continued to churn out news stories for nearly a half century until 1982.

On exhibition (Reservation required for groups)

Newspaper Museum

●Hours open: 10:00–17:00 (Entry closes at 16:30)
●Admission fee: Free
●Days closed: Sundays, public holidays, year-end and New Year holidays
●Address: 172 Yoyasu-machi, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto-shi, Kumamoto 860-8506
●Tel: +81-96-361-3071
●URL: https://museum.kumanichi.com/
●Access: 7 mins. on foot from Heisei Sta., JR Hohi-Honsen